Amazon.com: The 21 Bitcoin Computer: Computers & Accessories

Every computer is the Bitcoin computer

Bitcoin doesn't require any special hardware, as it can be used on any device which can do computations. To make a Bitcoin transaction you need to create a ECDSA signature, which is just math, something which all computers do well. You can do it both on resource-constrained like smart cards (think SIM cards) and on large servers alike.
The idea that you need a special Bitcoin computer to use Bitcoin is outright harmful, as it limits your choices and dupes you into buying overpriced proprietary hardware which gives the vendor more control of what you can and cannot do. This is very much against the spirit of Bitcoin which can thrive only as an open system.
So yeah, that thing 21 inc is trying to sell makes no sense, whatsoever.
But a lot of people think that "there might be something in it", let me go through the theories of why this device makes sense:
  1. "It is a dev kit!". Let me guess, you aren't a programmer. Or if you're a programmer, you're a shitty programmer and should be ashamed of yourself. You do not need any dev kit for Bitcoin, all you need is open source software (and, maybe, some internet services, optionally). When I wanted to try to do something Bitcoin related back in 2011, all I needed was to download bitcoind and install it on my $10/month VPS. Then I looked through RPC API call list and made a Bitcoin-settled futures exchange. The whole thing took me only a week. I didn't need to pay $400 for a devkit. Learning how to work with bitcoind took less than a day. There are hundreds of Bitcoin companies and thousands of hobbyist working on Bitcoin projects, none of them needed any sort of a dev kit.
  2. "It is useful because it has APIs and pre-installed software!" No, see above. If needed, pre-installed software can be delivered in a form of a virtual machine (e.g. VirtualBox, VMware, etc), no need for a physical device.
  3. "It is useful because it comes with a micropayment service/API". Nope. These things can be done in software, no need for custom hardware. Obviously, a micropayment system can be more widely adopted when it is open. If it is tied to custom hardware (which I doubt) then you have a vendor lock-in which is exactly the thing we're trying to avoid with Bitcoin.
  4. "it comes with pre-installed marketplace". So what, we have marketplaces such as OpenBazaar. If there are useful features in the 21 inc's marketplace we can replicated them in open source software.
  5. "It's convenient for users!" Are you saying that a $400 device which you need to be connected to a laptop is more convenient than a service which can run in a browser?
  6. "It might offer better security". We already have devices such as Trezor which can protect bitcoins from unsecure operating system. Trezor costs much less than $400 and is actually useful. Even though it was done by a small company without much capital.
  7. "It can be used for applications like a reputation system, etc." When telecom companies wanted an ability to differentiate between users, they created smartcard-based SIM cards. This technology is many decades old. Using Bitcoin for a reputation system is a bad idea, as it is not designed for that. If device holds 1000 satoshi to give it an identity weight, a guy who has 1 bitcoin can impersonate 10000 such devices. It just not going to work.
  8. "A constant stream of bitcoins it mines is convenient for users." User has to pay for this device, he might as well just buy bitcoins. If it is necessary for bitcoins to be attached to hardware, this can be done using a tiny dongle which costs less than $1 to manufacture, or a smart card.
  9. "But this device got backed by VCs and large companies, there must be something to it, we are just too stupid to comprehend its greatness". Well...
There is, indeed, a very simple explanation of this device's existnce: Balaji's reality distortion field. He is a prominent VC, so it was relatively easy to convince others that it's a worthy idea. The big vision behind it -- the financial network of devices -- is actually great. And then there is a question of execution. A guy like Balaji is supposed to be an expert in assessing feasibility of execution. So, as we can guess, investors trusted him. As many VCs tell, they invest in people. They cannot examine nitty-gritty technical details, but just look at skills, track record, etc.
So the fact that it got large investments and generates a lot of hype doesn't mean much, there was a plenty of such companies during dotcom boom.
It's quite like :CueCat. As we now know, an ability to scan a printed code and open a web page which it points to is very useful, a lot of people use QR codes, they are ubiquitous. This was exactly the vision behind CueCat. But it was implemented as a dedicated hardware device, not as a smartphone app, as there were no smartphones at that time. So after a lot of hype and aggressive marketing the company failed, but just few years later their vision became realized in QR reader apps.
Hardware becomes increasingly irrelevant. As Mark Andreessen, Balaji's partner, [once said], software is eating the world. Solving problems which can be solved software using custom hardware is just silly.
Balaji talks about internet-of-things applications where devices mine bitcoins and use them to buy services they need to function. Well, in the end, user pays for that, as he pays for physical chips and electricity. It would be more efficient for him to pay directly than to use this mining-based scheme. And it's possible to do so using software. E.g. imagine you have a lot of smart devices which use external services in your home. It would be nice if you can just aggregate the bill and pay it off automatically, say $2/month. Why only $2? Well, if there is a device consuming $20/month, it needs some serious mining abilities, so it will cost much more than $20 in electricity bills...
Maybe 21 inc will eventually pivot into purely software solutions, they have a lot of money to play with. But the current generation of devices they make just makes no sense, whatsoever, and people who try to find something useful in them just waste their time.
EDIT: One plausible case for using custom hardware is a possibility of off-chain microtransactions using trusted hardware. Not unlike MintChip conceptually. But size of the device as well as its price is puzzling in this case, as this can be implemented (and was already implemented) in smart card form factor.
submitted by killerstorm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

All The Longreads (So Far)

I'm trying to work on a system that would pull only the longreads links out and shove them into their own RSS feed. It's super hacky and embarrassing and all the other things that prevent people from sharing code (I will eventually, I promise...it's only 11 lines of python right now). But, I should at least share all the links, by date, in a post. Please enjoy all the longreads:
Tue, 20 Nov 2018 21:56:00 -0000 * How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes * Self-driving trucks in US offer window into where machines may replace humans * When Elon Musk Tunnels Under Your Home * The Case Against Quantum Computing * HOW GOOGLE AND AMAZON GOT AWAY WITH NOT BEING REGULATED * How to Use an iPod Touch as a Secure Device Instead of a Phone * Scientists say goodbye to physical definition of the kilogram
Fri, 16 Nov 2018 22:15:10 -0000 * THE GENIUS NEUROSCIENTIST WHO MIGHT HOLD THE KEY TO TRUE AI * Are Killer Robots the Future of War? Parsing the Facts on Autonomous Weapons * The Internet Has a Huge C/C++ Problem and Developers Don't Want to Deal With It * How Superhuman Built an Engine to Find Product/Market Fit * THE HAIL MARY PLAN TO RESTART A HACKED US ELECTRIC GRID * Space Camp grows up
Fri, 09 Nov 2018 21:56:00 -0000 * Why Technology Favors Tyranny * Tech C.E.O.s Are in Love With Their Principal Doomsayer * HQ Trivia was a blockbuster hit — but internal turmoil and a shrinking audience have pushed its company to the brink * ‘It’s Giant and Has Like Five Million Buttons.’ The Office Desk Phone Won’t Die * Why Doctors Hate Their Computers * Here Comes ‘Smart Dust,’ the Tiny Computers That Pull Power from the Air * ASTRONOMERS SEE MATERIAL ORBITING A BLACK HOLE RIGHT AT THE EDGE OF FOREVER
Fri, 02 Nov 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * The Facebook Dilemma, Part 1 * The Facebook Dilemma, Part 2 * A Cryptocurrency Millionaire Wants to Build a Utopia in Nevada * The Man Behind the Scooter Revolution * A Fork in the Road for Avis * The Encyclopedia of the Missing
Fri, 26 Oct 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * Inside Rockstar Games' Culture Of Crunch * At Netflix, Radical Transparency and Blunt Firings Unsettle the Ranks * Podcast on Netflix Culture * It Might Get Loud: Inside Silicon Valley’s Battle to Own Voice Tech * How Dara Khosrowshahi’s Iranian heritage shapes how he leads Uber * AN ALTERNATIVE HISTORY OF SILICON VALLEY DISRUPTION
Fri, 05 Oct 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * The iPhone XS & XS Max Review: Unveiling the Silicon Secrets * Sex Workers Pioneered the Early Internet—and It Screwed Them Over * Raised by YouTube * Old Unicorn, New Tricks: Airbnb Has A Sky-High Valuation. Here's Its Audacious Plan To Earn It * EA announces ‘FIFA 19’ PS4 esports tournament
Fri, 28 Sep 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * How Uber is getting flying cars off the ground * Coinbase Wants To Be Too Big To Fail * The Apple Watch – Tipping Point Time for Healthcare * Meet the Community Keeping Obsolete Supercomputers Alive * The first Android phone 10 years later: An annotated review * Hacker says he'll livestream deletion of Zuckerberg's Facebook page
Fri, 21 Sep 2018 20:46:00 -0000 * Inside Facebook’s Election ‘War Room’ * Bitcoin Miners Flock to New York’s Remote Corners, but Get Chilly Reception * Living The Stream * A brief history of the numeric keypad * Inside the Dramatic, Painful--and Hugely Successful--Return of Reddit's Founders
Fri, 14 Sep 2018 20:55:47 -0000 * Android 9 Pie, thoroughly reviewed * Why a Leading Venture Capitalist Is Betting on a Decentralized Internet * Olaf Carlson-Wee Rode the Bitcoin Boom to Silicon Valley Riches. Can He Survive the Crash? * Memo to the Silicon Valley boys’ club: Arlan Hamilton has no time for your BS * Driverless Hype Collides With Merciless Reality
Fri, 07 Sep 2018 21:02:25 -0000 * Inside the World of Eddy Cue, Apple’s Services Chief * Bezos Unbound: Exclusive Interview With The Amazon Founder On What He Plans To Conquer Next * The Super Rich of Silicon Valley Have a Doomsday Escape Plan * What went wrong at Social Capital * How Android Pie’s Adaptive Battery and Adaptive Brightness work * The man who won the lottery 14 times
Fri, 31 Aug 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * Franken-algorithms: the deadly consequences of unpredictable code * Logged off: meet the teens who refuse to use social media * How Big Tech Swallowed Seattle * The Mystery of People Who Speak Dozens of Languages
Fri, 17 Aug 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * VIRGIN GALACTIC’S ROCKET MAN * Inside Evernote’s brain * LET’S ALL GO BACK TO TUMBLR * Why Can’t Europe Do Tech? * To Get Ready for Robot Driving, Some Want to Reprogram Pedestrians
Fri, 03 Aug 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * How Robot Hands Are Evolving to Do What Ours Can * Why the Next Silicon Valley Will Probably Be Outside the U.S. * Masayoshi Son’s secret to running his $100 billion fund: Telling start-ups to treat each other like family * What Happened to General Magic? * Growing Up Jobs
Fri, 27 Jul 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * Brock Pierce: The Hippie King of Cryptocurrency * How Silicon Valley Has Disrupted Philanthropy * THE 'GUERRILLA' WIKIPEDIA EDITORS WHO COMBAT CONSPIRACY THEORIES * Inside Google’s Shadow Workforce * MySpace and the Coding Legacy it Left Behind
Fri, 13 Jul 2018 20:55:00 -0000 * Hell for Elon Musk Is a Midsize Sedan * How Twitter Became Home to the Teen Status Update * Why Some of Instagram's Biggest Memers Are Locking Their Accounts * GEORGE HOTZ IS ON A HACKER CRUSADE AGAINST THE ‘SCAM’ OF SELF-DRIVING CARS * THE ONLY GOOD ONLINE FANDOM LEFT IS DUNE * Netflix Isn’t Being Reckless, It’s Just Playing a Game No One Else Dares (Netflix Misunderstandings, Pt. 3)
Fri, 22 Jun 2018 20:50:39 -0000 * How Twitter Made The Tech World's Most Unlikely Comeback * The Legend of Nintendo * Intel now faces a fight for its future * INSIDE THE CRYPTO WORLD'S BIGGEST SCANDAL
Fri, 08 Jun 2018 20:57:00 -0000 * ‘I can understand about 50 percent of the things you say’: How Congress is struggling to get smart on tech * The Twitter crime mystery that gripped Spain * Meet the people who still use Myspace: 'It's given me so much joy' * Exploring The Digital Ruins Of 'Second Life' * Why Aren’t We All Buying Houses on the Internet?
Fri, 01 Jun 2018 20:57:00 -0000 * Obama's US Digital Service Survives Trump—Quietly * he Search for Women Who Want Cybersecurity Careers * How Futures Trading Changed Bitcoin Prices * The Growing Emptiness of the "Star Wars" Universe
Fri, 11 May 2018 20:57:00 -0000 * Don't Skype Me: How Microsoft Turned Consumers Against a Beloved Brand * How to Make Your Open Office Less Annoying * The 15 People Who Keep Wikipedia’s Editors From Killing Each Other * The Wealthy Are Hoarding $10 Billion of Bitcoin in Bunkers * Supercomputers are driving a revolution in hurricane forecasting
Fri, 04 May 2018 20:57:00 -0000 * ‘Hi, It’s Amazon Calling. Here’s What We Don’t Like in Your City.’ * Over 400 Startups Are Trying to Become the Next Warby Parker. Inside the Wild Race to Overthrow Every Consumer Category * All We Want to Do Is Watch Each Other Play Video Games * CoinTalk
Fri, 27 Apr 2018 20:30:29 -0000 * Inside Jeff Bezos’s DC Life * Hulu Beyond 'Handmaid's Tale': Execs and Stars on a Promising Yet Uncertain Future * Can Silicon Valley Get You Pregnant? * You could be flirting on dating apps with paid impersonators
Fri, 06 Apr 2018 21:05:17 -0000 * Lawyer bots take the hassle out of fighting parking tickets and property taxes — and could cost local governments real revenue * How Europe’s new privacy rule is reshaping the internet * Checking in with the Facebook fact-checking partnership * A 200-Year-Old Idea Offers A New Way to Trace Stolen Bitcoins * South Korean millennials are reeling from the Bitcoin bust
submitted by berrydewd to RideHome [link] [comments]

if you think the 21inc bitcoin computer is a waste of money because of ROI, i believe you're missing the point

i keep seeing posts about people being upset because they can't understand why someone would pay $400 for a raspberry pi with a mining shield, a big ass heatsink, and a fan. this isn't marketed as a bitcoin mining device. it's being marketed as a device (a dev kit for future devices, at this point) that is designed to integrate with bitcoin in many ways. mining is one (and definitely not the only one) of the ways it does that. and it's not mining to just be mining.
i'm not super familiar with the ins and outs of this newfangled device, but it seems to me like the satoshis are for other uses, like smart contract kinds of uses. the things are definitely not mining for profit.
i don't get everyone's obsession with ROI. would you be considering the ROI if you were investing in any other computer? obviously a computer is an investment, but the value you get out of it is from its utility. you can do all kinds of crazy cool shit with a computer. things you never imagined you could do before. i recently got a raspberry pi, and the uses seem endless. i never thought i would be learning about linux, coding, web design, electronics, robotics, music, web servers, home servers, proxys, radio, graphic design, and home automation, all because of the same little device! i don't see anything keeping this 21inc device from being a great tool for bitcoin innovation on many levels. and it seems they're just getting started.
it also seems to me like 21inc will eventually have a very decentralized mining pool. plus, the existence of another mining pool adds decentralization to bitcoin mining in general. right?
perhaps someone who is more knowledgeable could elaborate or cmv?
tl;dr the 21 inc computer is not a mining rig. it's a computer. it does stuff. some people find value in that.
submitted by ringlocksmith to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The 8 most informative comments about 21inc's bitcoin computer dev kit

"Anyone who thinks this is about making money by mining has very little insight into what Bitcoin actually offers the world. This is not about bringing the old economy (banks, businesses, governments) into the Bitcoin family. This is about building entirely new economies, ones that have never and could never have existed before. 21inc can see the vision and they just bootstrapped the IoT on the Bitcoin blockchain. Thank your lucky stars on your way to the moon." - PhiMinD
"I'm fairly sure this is NOT an end user device. This device appears to be solely for the purpose of prototyping integration with other devices, and allow people to work out the ends and outs of the process. My assumption is that in like 6 months to a year, a much more compact and integrated device will be released that would be far cheaper, and suitable for installation in actual consumer devices. This is for developers." - DakotaChiliBeans
"The more I think about it, the more incredible and groundbreaking this seems. When every piece of hardware and software has the ability to transfer money, our entire concept of how we do everything changes. We're only beginning to imagine the possibilities. Even the few simple ones I've been thinking of make my head spin. Bitcoin as a human currency is exciting. Creates a more open system, breaks monopoly, gives you the option of true, non-revocable ownership. All great stuff. But it's these revolutionary ideas that make me believe that Bitcoin, or a successor very much like it, will take over the world. As someone invested in bitcoin, I'd like to see it succeed and my investment pay off, but goddamn will this be an exciting ride regardless. At this point, I'm seriously thinking of buying and developing on it. The potential here is lightyears beyond what most people are thinking." - consideranon
"Seeing the 21 Bitcoin computer reminds me of the developer kits for oculus rift. It took a lot of time to perfect before going fully public. It was also tested with a pre-release through Samsung's VR headset. Other more resourceful people bought the cardboard much like the same people would buy the Raspberry Pi instead of this. Anyway, the 21 computer is very likely the first iteration of many." - Hiro_Y3
"I think it removes a step in the process. Instead of learning about wallets, private keys, maintaining a login and password, etc, the computer takes care of all of that without the user having to think about any of it. The mining function provides initial liquidity to get the ball rolling. This is the first step of payments being built into the IoT." -TDBit
"Most of everybody here is missing the point. This is a bitcoin computer. This is not made to simply mine to generate a profit but rather a miner is just an added part. The miner is used to continuously supply the Bitcoin computer with bitcoin. It uses the bitcoin to "write" to the blockchain. It's like a digital quill with an endless bitcoin inkwell." -Fuzzypickles69
"Ok, this takes a leap of faith, but what they're trying to do is build a full-stack device which can send/receive bitcoin and which also solves the "how do devices get bitcoin in the first place" problem. Imagine the whole thing being a lot smaller and cheaper, and embedded in lots of devices globally. Now you have a world in which millions of devices (machines) can send and receive tiny payments, and which natively have a currency unit to use for that purpose." - melbustus
"ServiceXYZ: Links your 21 box to your Twitter account, and any paywall website lets you read anything you want without popups, ads, or subscriptions. There, I just made up a business in 10 seconds, someone go make it :)" - evoorhees
These comments were pointed to by balaji himself, here.. https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/3lv6zj/ama_request_ceo_of_21inc_balaji_srinivasan/cv9zq9q
submitted by phieziu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Slack log for Ark token's value proposition discussion 16-07-18

Please find below a log of the discussion we had in slack regarding the ark token's value proposition. Some of the community members who happen to be long term holders of ark feel that the ark token's value proposition isn't clearly communicated by the team so they asked about it. I'm posting the entire discussion it here to make a permanent record since slack wipes messages after a while.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
arigard [7:21 PM]
Hey team, so I'm curious. Is there any update on a new white paper at all that was being mentioned? I've been holding Ark since it hit Bittrex and I personally don't really have a clear idea about how the token is going to work in the overall picture, or what really the direction is for the project once v2 is out. It feels like things have gone a bit flat recently, are there any updates on direction and what the plan is once V2 is live? Is there any idea about when it might go live? Or how the Ark token will fit into the economy (will it be a gas?). I see a lot of other projects i'm invested in coming up with very clear roadmaps/dates and direction about what they want to be and I still personally feel Ark's message is a little confused and hard to read especially for people who are not coders/developers.
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:22 PM]
the roadmap is on the site, arkdirectory.com/kits has nice presentations and other goodies
roks0n (deadlock) [7:23 PM]
@Matthew_DC mentioned a couple of days ago that he’s preparing several blog posts which should explain most of these @arigard
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:23 PM]
the Blog also goes into lots of v2 details
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:24 PM]
Hi everyone.
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:24 PM]
Ark is Ark, not like Eth with gas, hence no gas.
Hey @Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) welcome back
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:24 PM]
Hey rob, hi Rok :slightly_smiling_face:
roks0n (deadlock) [7:25 PM]
Rob, I think he means how everything will be connected with ArkVM etc.
similar conversation as the one few days ago (edited)
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:25 PM]
It's been a while, but I was head on in the project, sorry for not showing more often.
arigard [7:25 PM]
Yeah my main question is really I still don't know what will give the actual Ark token value .
goldenpepe [7:25 PM]
we dont know how the arkvm will work
All we can do is wait
Doubled1c3 (ArkStickers.com) [7:26 PM]
uploaded and commented on this image: bucket.jpg
@Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe)
goldenpepe [7:26 PM]
We can make assumptions but that's all they'll be
roks0n (deadlock) [7:26 PM]
@arigard this was the discussion: https://arkecosystem.slack.com/archives/C2ABRLZB8/p1531422791000216
roks0n (deadlock)
definitely, I’m not blaming anyone :slightly_smiling_face: Was just curious if there were any developments in terms of the updated whitepaper because I was reading one of the threads on reddit from 6 months ago where it was mentioned you’re looking to hire someone write it up.
Posted in #generalJul 12th
arigard [7:26 PM]
And I kind of feel this is such a big elephant in the room for people in the long run.
roks0n (deadlock) [7:26 PM]
click on the link and read from that post on (edited)
arigard [7:26 PM]
ok
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:27 PM]
I saw that there has been some drawbacks with the V2 ?
(Not sure if it's exact, I only came a few times and seemed to understand it was so)
goldenpepe [7:28 PM]
There are just some incompatibilities between v1 and v2 in devnet
which is why devnet is currently down
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:28 PM]
ArkVM may be unnecessary as more modern approaches to handling contracts are available, one of the main issue is having them be distributed just like the tokens.
goldenpepe [7:28 PM]
There's a community run v2-only devnet though #devnet_unofficial
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:28 PM]
it's more like drawback with v1
arigard [7:30 PM]
I mean I've seen a lot of stuff in that discussion discussed over the past year and there still seems to be no concrete answers coming out and that is a bit of worry to me personally. It makes it look like the team doesn't even know. I think most that know of Ark understand it wants to create an easy way to deploy blockchains and work as a platform and have some inoperability options. But the fundamentals of how that work right now seems to be up in the air. In other projects I know what gives those tokens value, but in Ark I don't, so it's hard for me as an investor to really sell to someone else the benefits of the token when there is a big question mark still on it.
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:33 PM]
do you know that Ark Deployer has been available for quite some time?
arigard [7:34 PM]
Yes, that doesn't really answer any questions though.
mak [7:34 PM]
Ark deployer helps the main chain's business case somehow?
arigard [7:35 PM]
What gives Ark token actual value? Like what is the reason people need to buy and hold the Ark token? That is my question.
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:36 PM]
@mak what you're saying is kinda like answering you can use a hammer when asked what a nail do.
arigard [7:36 PM]
You don't need to buy the Ark token to deploy a chain. You can just do it.
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:36 PM]
I mean, the Ark Deployer doesn't answer what's the Ark.
mak [7:36 PM]
@Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) my point was directed towards rob's comment. I think you misunderstood it.
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:37 PM]
@mak My bad then. I apologize.
Blockhunter [7:38 PM]
:boogieark9:
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:38 PM]
" I think most that know of Ark understand it wants to create an easy way to deploy blockchains and work as a platform and have some inoperability options. But the fundamentals of how that work right now seems to be up in the air."
This is why I wrote that.. there is no mystery of how that works. You are mistaken or uninformed.
arkenstone [7:38 PM]
That's the problem here because team is programming orientated but there hasn't been alot done on business aspect of the token and marketing investor point big view
mak [7:38 PM]
That only explains the value of the ark codebase not the blockchain though
arigard [7:38 PM]
I think you seem to be trying to turn the argument in a seperate direction.
It's a simple question.
What gives the Ark token value.
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:39 PM]
The market does. It's on 19 different exchanges.
arigard [7:39 PM]
Seems like you are being unhelpfully obtuse. I'll rephrase.
roks0n (deadlock) [7:39 PM]
so one thing that is clear to me is interoperability using ACES, where ARK is used as a “middleman” between two different chains, so if there’s high volume between those chains, it means the volume of ark increases as well .. what I’d like to know is how things will work with arkvm and how it will all work with sidechains (on eth, all the side chains will basically link back to the main chain which will be the one responsible for security afaik?)
arigard [7:39 PM]
What gives the Ark token value in the Ark ecosystem.
Blockhunter [7:40 PM]
Vote for Pedro he will make all your dreams come true
arigard [7:40 PM]
Eth is a gas, Waves is a gas. Ark is... what?
mak [7:40 PM]
ACES can work with any chains though. Doesn't have to be ark main chain. So I guess tomorrow persona can become the settlement layer for the Ark ecosystem and there's no incentive to stop it from happening.
arigard [7:40 PM]
^
roks0n (deadlock) [7:41 PM]
Mak, correct but if there are already lots of chains connected between ARK, it will be more appealing to link it through ARK directly
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:41 PM]
As I understand it, ACES could be using any given blockchain as the middle man...
roks0n (deadlock) [7:41 PM]
it doesn’t mean that it can’t be copied tho
arigard [7:41 PM]
But there are no chains connected through Ark atm
That have any real value anyway
roks0n (deadlock) [7:41 PM]
eth and btc are
arigard [7:41 PM]
And they can be connected through any Ark clone.
bangomatic [7:41 PM]
I'd love to hear the Ark team chime in on this discussion
arigard [7:42 PM]
So anyone can come along and make another chain that can instantly overtake Ark at this present time if there isn't a failsafe reason for Ark to be the defacto currency.
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:42 PM]
https://arkecosystem.slack.com/archives/C2ABRLZB8/p1531762883000422 you can't keep saying things like this as if they are true.
arigard
That have any real value anyway
Posted in #generalToday at 7:41 PM
Blockhunter [7:42 PM]
Interoperability to the moon
mak [7:42 PM]
"it will be more appealing to link it through ARK directly"
Currently Ark is the only mature chain because it's been around longer but the moment persona or some other bridge chain gets listed on an exchange that dynamic is no longer there. So why would you prefer Ark over persona when that happens. That's the question as far as I understand it. (edited)
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:43 PM]
Persona has other goals, not duplicating Ark goals
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:43 PM]
@bangomatic Hi!
arigard [7:43 PM]
What current sidechain of Ark has real value/position in the crypto market? Persona?
bangomatic [7:43 PM]
hey @Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe)!
mak [7:43 PM]
The blockchain as a transaction medium doesn't care about secondary goals.
It still has all the capabilities that Ark has.
Colby [7:43 PM]
What has value right now? :thinking_face:
rob [ Ark Labs ]
https://arkecosystem.slack.com/archives/C2ABRLZB8/p1531762883000422 you can't keep saying things like this as if they are true.
https://arkecosystem.slack.com/archives/C2ABRLZB8/p1531762883000422
Posted in #generalToday at 7:42 PM
arigard [7:43 PM]
Ark's ecosystem at present is not big enough to be a reason not to just take the tech and start your own.
To think otherwise is ludicrous.
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:44 PM]
that's a fine opinion
Jarunik [7:44 PM]
it is harder than you think :slightly_smiling_face:
arigard [7:44 PM]
We aren't Eth with multi $100mn + start ups and even if we were, what's currently to stop one of those just overtaking Ark and leaving it behind?
Jarunik [7:45 PM]
i hope some ark clones get really sucessful to be honest :slightly_smiling_face:
Colby [7:45 PM]
Same here!
Jarunik
i hope some ark clones get really sucessful to be honest :slightly_smiling_face:
Posted in #generalToday at 7:45 PM
Blockhunter [7:45 PM]
HODL ROCKET TECHNOLOGY
mak [7:45 PM]
Same here but then there's no reason to hold Ark over something else
arigard [7:45 PM]
i hope so too if there is some reason for Ark to always be there at the top considering it's the Ark platform.
Colby [7:45 PM]
But the thing is that I am wondering, if ark clones get successful, what benefits does it give back to ark
Djenny Floro (Ark Tribe) [7:45 PM]
@Jarunik to create an ecosystem?
mak [7:45 PM]
Right now we have to consider Ark's value not the other bridge chains
arigard [7:45 PM]
But if there isn't a reason for Ark to exist at the top, why are we all holding it?
Colby [7:45 PM]
Haha I think we are all thinking the same :slightly_smiling_face:
arigard [7:45 PM]
It's a terrible business plan
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:46 PM]
the point of BridgeChains is to allow new projects with no access the market a path to them through Ark, and hence gain value.
Other blockchains connections are through ACES, such as BTC, LTC, ETH, and more coming..
Persona has a way to trade Ark <> Prs
arigard [7:47 PM]
What is to stop them from getting their own exchanges in the future and just using Ark as a stepping stone to becoming their own platform operator?
mak [7:47 PM]
Sure rob, but there's now 10 different projects doing the same and they are faster in development than the ark team is
arigard [7:47 PM]
^
Blockhunter [7:47 PM]
Ark is the Yoda of blockchain and they need a better catchphrase. Better than ark gives no dates or point click blockchain
arigard [7:48 PM]
This attitude seems horribly naive if this is the value proposition.
mak [7:48 PM]
All of us believe in the vision that Ark brought us but I personally am not sure if Ark is the best option to execute that vision in time
arigard [7:48 PM]
The issue is, we don't know what the value proposition is.
mak [7:48 PM]
Other projects seem much faster
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:48 PM]
if you are into speculation, which it seems you are, then on paper all of your projects with no code are better and have more value than Ark
arigard [7:48 PM]
That's not true at all. lol.
Matthew_DC [7:49 PM]
At the most base level, ARK is a common currency token that is essentially automatically compatible with every bridge chain that is built based on ARK and is optimized for transaction volume and throughput to avoid bloat of other mechanisms introduced by the other chains. That is at the most basic level. By holding the ARK token itself, you will be able to enact the functions of multiple bridged chains both issued by our team and others. You will also be able to utilize the ARK chain as a pegged token to many bridged chains but that process will be transparent to users as it will be done behind the scenes without the user needing to do any functions. To think that someone will fork the code and generate a more effective ARK main chain means you have no confidence in the ARK team as the primary developer of the technology itself. In this case, if we are not and someone pushes a better version of the network, then I would argue maybe they SHOULD be chosen. That is the point of a free and open market. Not to mention the potential for registering and providing snapshot hashes to the main ARK blockchain to provide added security measures to a bridge chain with lower security due to lower market share etc, those are just baseline reasons.
As I mentioned the other day, at face value, consider this. What brings value to Litecoin or Bitcoin or Doge? In essence, ARK is a more effective currency and base network than all of these aforementioned networks with all of the added benefits being added for additional use cases.
roks0n (deadlock) [7:50 PM]
will ark based chains be bridged via arkvm?
goldenpepe [7:50 PM]
They cant be
You'd need the VM on both sides
Matthew_DC [7:50 PM]
I am currently on a conference call and have a lot going on so I can't respond too much.
goldenpepe [7:50 PM]
You can use AIP11's new tx types to do a sort of escrow between chains though i think
mak [7:50 PM]
@Matthew_DC Are you saying that the bridgechains deployed by ark-deployer don't have the same features?
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:50 PM]
ArkVM is not for bridging chains
goldenpepe [7:51 PM]
It can be
Coinme [7:51 PM]
And ICO's that will join Ark in the future will use it for buying their token.
goldenpepe [7:51 PM]
But both chains will need to be running the VM
Matthew_DC [7:51 PM]
The ARK main chain will have specific methods of allowing token transfer and utilization between chains to include quasi-centralized methods through aces, decentralized aces based intermediary networks, Time locked transfers, among custom built smart contract like logic built into the core technology itself that doesn't make the network susceptible to the bloat and mis-utilization an vulnerabilities of full VM use.
goldenpepe [7:51 PM]
(which the main ark chain wont be)
mak [7:51 PM]
"ICO's that will join Ark in the future will use it for buying their token"
Or any other bridgechain that's listed on exchanges
@Matthew_DC So will all of the bridgechains, no? I could start an ACES node today for persona and it will have no difference from what you describe.
Matthew_DC [7:52 PM]
@mak no, we promised ARK would be open source and everything we build for the core ARK blockchain will be open source.
arigard [7:53 PM]
You can be open source and still protect your value..
Matthew_DC [7:54 PM]
The point of ARK from day 1 has been to create a better base layer blockchain technology and protocol for everyone everywhere to be able to use to create anything they can dream up.
The ARK token is a core payment layer for the ecosystem including any applications we build ourselves, sponsor, partner with, or support.
mak [7:54 PM]
It seems like the team's vision for Ark is as a software product only and there's no business plan for the main chain. Which is fine but it's not explained as such. (edited)
Blockhunter [7:55 PM]
Great to see such active discussions
goldenpepe [7:55 PM]
I think what Matt is trying to portray is this:
A single universal Ark Ecosystem wallet holding ARK that has a nice UI with a list of dapps in the ecosystem
You select a dapp
You send a tx from the wallet using Ark
----------------Everything below this line is transparent to the user-----------------
The Ark transaction has instructions in the smartbridge field
The Ark gets converted to dappCoin via an intermediary like ACES (trustful) or a trustless escrow smart contract
The intermediary received Ark and uses the dappCoin on the dapp chain to do whatever it is the user wanted to do using the instructions in the smartbridge field
The dappchain responds to the request to the intermediary
Intermediary sends an Ark tx with the results of the dapp computation/action in the smartbridge field
---------------Everything above this line is transparent to the user-------------------
After 8+ seconds, user's wallet shows them the result of their interaction with the dapp bridgechain
That's where the value of Ark will come from
The Ark coin will be a universal "omni-coin"
Matthew_DC [7:56 PM]
:this: This
goldenpepe [7:56 PM]
That will instantly shapeshift into bridgechain coins to interact with the bridgechain dapp
mak [7:58 PM]
I understand what your point is and I agree it will work but only as long as none of the bridge chains are on an exchange
when for example persona gets listed on binance the scenario changes
and now either chain can become the backbone of the ark ecosystem
arigard [7:58 PM]
Yes. We see that. But hypothetically what is to stop a bridged Ark chain from becoming bigger than Ark and then going on to become that gateway? At this point it just seems to be hopium that the Ark network will always be the one people look to. But in one year, or two, or five, it might not be the case. What is to stop Ark being just sidelined if another team come along with develop on what Ark has built and propel it forward and take the mantle?
goldenpepe [7:58 PM]
What you say will be a problem only if the utility of the dapp coin is greater than the utility of the ark omnicoin
Would you rather hold a coin that can do one thing and is forever tied to a single chain
arigard [7:59 PM]
But in other crypto's an app becoming sucessfull is a benefit. In Ark's network it could be a negative.
goldenpepe [7:59 PM]
Or would you rather hold a coin that can interact with that single chain and 3232523432 others
arigard [7:59 PM]
But why can't another coin become an omnicoin?
If there are no limitations against it
goldenpepe [7:59 PM]
Why can't another coin become ethereum?
mak [7:59 PM]
"What you say will be a problem only if the utility of the dapp coin is greater than the utility of the ark omnicoin"
Or if it gives out better staking returns etc like persona because of higher inflation rate
goldenpepe [7:59 PM]
if there are no limitations against it
You can literally go on AWS right now and deploy an ethereum clone chain
arigard [7:59 PM]
It can, but an ETH token can't oust ETH
That's the difference. We are giving people an easy route here.
rob [ Ark Labs ] [7:59 PM]
do you often think your children should not surpass you? Or is that the hope?
Matthew_DC [8:00 PM]
Well it's about security, trust, potential vulnerabilities due to added functionality, the ability of the bridgechain team to create interactions and focus on use cases for their token outside of their core use, etc.
But that's the point of open and free markets
goldenpepe [8:00 PM]
There is a solution to your concern @arigard
Matthew_DC [8:00 PM]
What is to stop someone from being better than Bitcoin?
arigard [8:01 PM]
I think all these strawman arguments are fun, but they still aren't adressing the issuel
goldenpepe [8:01 PM]
Instead of having Ark Deployer literally cloning the ark codebase, have it be a turnkey solution to run a layer 2 chain
Matthew_DC [8:01 PM]
You could go fork Ethereum right now and have an exact copy of the capability of the main Eth chain.
goldenpepe [8:01 PM]
bridgechain dapps can be "colored coins"
that are forever tied to the main chain
arigard [8:01 PM]
Yeah but you wouldn't have those businesses on the chain.
goldenpepe [8:01 PM]
but that would introduce bloat
Matthew_DC [8:01 PM]
So you are saying the utility of Ethereum is adoption.
arigard [8:01 PM]
And those businesses won't have the potential to become the main ETH.
Matthew_DC [8:01 PM]
Which is the case for the value of any token.
goldenpepe [8:01 PM]
@arigard It sounds like you want ark to become Ethereum Plasma
arigard [8:02 PM]
I just want an answer.
Matthew_DC [8:02 PM]
How many companies are pulling their ERC20 tokens off of Ethereum because of the issues?
Colby [8:02 PM]
Yeah but correct me if im wrong
goldenpepe [8:02 PM]
There is no answer that will satisfy what you are asking
arigard [8:02 PM]
And i keep getting strawmanned.
Colby [8:02 PM]
Ethereum projects NEED eth for gas
Matthew_DC [8:02 PM]
We talk to people almost every day that are looking to leave Ethereum.
Colby [8:02 PM]
Ark is needed for?
arigard [8:02 PM]
^
Colby [8:02 PM]
This is all I am wondering, where does the ark coin fit into it
I love the idea
goldenpepe [8:02 PM]
@arigard You want ark-based coins to rely on Ark
The team wants the Ark chain to not be bloated
The solution to this is unironically ethereum plasma and sharding
Colby [8:02 PM]
but have been waiting for a while to know how the Ark coin will actually be used
goldenpepe [8:03 PM]
Shards in ethereum are basically "bridgechains"
arigard [8:03 PM]
Ok, and those teams might be big enough and clued up enough to eventually knock Ark from being the de facto omni coin. That's the worry.
If this is in fact the possibility.
Then it should be clear.
mak [8:03 PM]
"You could go fork Ethereum right now and have an exact copy of the capability of the main Eth chain."
@Matthew_DC Ethereum has value because all the dapps live on it which is not true for ark
arigard [8:03 PM]
Because as an investor it worries me, a lot.
I don't know where the value of Ark as an investment is 100% right now.
Jarunik [8:03 PM]
Ark is basically the inverse approach to Ethereum. Eth goes for big one-fits all first and tries to shard ... Ark is creating shards and then combines them
goldenpepe [8:03 PM]
There is no solution to what @arigard and @mak are saying right now
Literally no existing solution
Only proposals like sharding
arigard [8:04 PM]
And all this noise about defensiveness doesn't help. These are legit concerns.
Matthew_DC [8:04 PM]
When was it not clear that if a company comes along and builds a better more used product it could potentially take over market share?
That's how all free markets work.
You can't believe in open source and build and open source product without that risk.
arigard [8:04 PM]
But that isn't the same thing. Ark is literally building THE tools for people to then do that.
mak [8:04 PM]
@Matthew_DC Just to clarify I appreciate the work you guys are doing but I want to make an informed investment decision about holding the ark token
arigard [8:04 PM]
As a platform.
Jarunik [8:04 PM]
yes ... that is the idea how to grow
arigard [8:04 PM]
if you cloned Bitcoin back in the day you were a seperate currency.
Jarunik [8:04 PM]
provide good tools for others to create chains
arigard [8:04 PM]
This is a platform, its totally different.
And what we are discuswsing here is who runs that platform.
Matthew_DC [8:05 PM]
If someone launched an Ethereum chain right now and gained adoption there is a huge potential that all tokens decide to move their ERC20 tokens to the new chain and it becomes the new Ethereum and you have in essence lost all value because Ethereum is not capable of being used on the bridge chain as a currency.
ARK maintains it's value if for no other reason than the pegged value to any chain we personally create to include VM chain, token issuance chain, etc.
arigard [8:05 PM]
If it's built by Ark, does Ark always retain control? if not, why? What happens if Ark ends up building tools for a subsidary project that propels itself above them. Investors will just move to that coin.
Matthew_DC [8:05 PM]
Because it's an open decentralized system.
The problem is people don't actually believe in decentralization if it possibly harms their potential for monetary gain.
rob [ Ark Labs ] [8:06 PM]
we hope bridgechains get popular because that also means more for Ark in many ways.
arigard [8:06 PM]
You can be decentralized without being 100% altruistic. It's not mutually exclusive.
mak [8:06 PM]
@goldenpepe Since you guys claim that there's no solution for this how about I present one which @Matthew_DC can decide if it's useful or not. Make delegate voting for the ArkVM happen on the main chain. So anyone who wants to become a delegate for the VM needs to hold money on the main chain.
arigard [8:07 PM]
It just seems people are being dogmatic about this.
And if this isn't about investment. Why have an ICO?
Matthew_DC [8:07 PM]
Ethereum being the core chain for all ERC20 token based businesses centralizes the industry in a massive way. Not only is Ethereum itself centralized in the way it's mining structure was developed, but it also is centralized in that if the Ethereum network is compromised, thousands of companies assets and business are now compromised.
We don't believe that is the future.
mak [8:07 PM]
I'm not saying that this should be done for all sidechains. Just for the VM and it will be a special case.
Matthew_DC [8:07 PM]
We believe in a different business model.
That has been at the core of every description and explanation I have given from day 1.
arigard [8:07 PM]
Ok and that's fine, but my point is this should be made very clear if it's the case.
From the team officially.
goldenpepe [8:07 PM]
@mak now you're strawmanning me
Matthew_DC [8:07 PM]
Where is it not clear?
goldenpepe [8:08 PM]
I was addressing the fact that the idea that bridgechains shouldnt be independent and should be tied to Ark being in conflict with the Ark team's idea that the main chain should not be bloated with dapps
The only plausible solution to that right now
is Ethereum Plasma
Sharding
yokoama (thefoundry Delegate) [8:09 PM]
Sharting
mak [8:09 PM]
"We believe in a different business model."
I respect that. But it changes the ark's value proposition to just being a source of funding to the ark team and a means of speculation.
goldenpepe [8:09 PM]
Shards in ethereum are like bridgechains but the coins are all erc20s that rely on ethereum
Matthew_DC [8:09 PM]
People said ARK's DPoS mechanism would be a failure when we changed the voting structure because they said it wouldn't be secure enough. It has turned out to be massively secure compared to the centralized cartel run solutions of other DPoS chains. This is another fundamental issue where we believe we have a model that will work and will create value and thousands of use cases for the ARK token in a seamless way for the average user.
goldenpepe [8:09 PM]
and the shard blocks dont interfere or bloat up the "main" eth chain
mak [8:09 PM]
@goldenpepe I'm not suggesting deploying dapps on main chain. Just that the voting should take place there so there is always incentive to keep money on the main chain.
Matthew_DC [8:10 PM]
At no point did we say ARK was gas and have constantly made sure to outline the differences between ARK and Ethereum.
I believe the Eth model is flawed.
goldenpepe [8:11 PM]
The current ethereum model is flawed
If sharding works then it's going to solve a lot of its issues
(i dont hold any ethereum btw)
arigard [8:12 PM]
At no point have we actually had an updated white paper discussing this question in detail, clearly. It's not on the website and if it is it's buried somewhere in a blog post. The fact these discussions keep cropping up is proof of this.
nukacolaplease [8:12 PM]
I think we don't understand clearly what makes Ark important after the launch of the sidechains, Ark will be only an "exchange token"? The sidechain doesn't need Ark for operating
goldenpepe [8:12 PM]
+1 on needing a new whitepaper
Matthew_DC [8:12 PM]
replied to a thread:
This is a means of centralization of the network. Instead, by utilizing a form of pegged bridge chains, we can maintain a similar effect without creating centralization and reliance on 1 chain for others to properly function.
arkenstone [8:12 PM]
I think these things should be clearly written in a new WB and officially made public and promoted
goldenpepe [8:12 PM]
A new whitepaper would clear up so much FUD
pieface [8:13 PM]
Yeah I think a new WP is needed for sure
arigard [8:13 PM]
So don't start going "Oh everybody knows this, it's clear" Show me where on the front page of the website it tells you how the token mechanics will work in the ecosystem? It's not good it being on some powerpoint on a google drive, or hidden in comments in the slack.
mak [8:13 PM]
I though there wasn't going to be a new whitepaper.
arigard [8:13 PM]
It needs to be clear to investors how it works, exactly.
goldenpepe [8:13 PM]
I agree with arigard here
I only know what I know because I live on slack
Matthew_DC [8:13 PM]
The solutions are still in development and there are always opportunities to continue to adapt the model, that's why I have these conversations and ask for feedback regularly, but the core fundamental belief of how open and free decentralized markets should work most likely won't change.
arkenstone [8:13 PM]
Same here
goldenpepe [8:14 PM]
The vast majority of ark holders have no idea
they just bought bc of the cool red triangle
arigard [8:14 PM]
Stop playing cute, this is people's money you are asking for. So at least give them the benefit of being honest that there is no inherent business model reason why Ark will be necessary in the future.
And let them make their decisions.
roks0n (deadlock) [8:14 PM]
I agree, it took me months of following discussion on slack and digging around reddit to get information
arigard [8:14 PM]
With proper information.
mak [8:14 PM]
replied to a thread:
It's centralizing value onto one chain but doesn't bottleneck the ecosystem so I don't see anything being wrong with that.
Matthew_DC [8:15 PM]
replied to a thread:
I'm not arguing with you and I made a clear post here within the last 2 days that our website messaging is shit and needs completely redone.
If the ARK network is compromised or the consensus mechanism of the ARK main net is compromised then all subsequent networks reliant on that consensus would be compromised as well.
mad4thrash [8:15 PM]
In my opinion Ark's value come from (in the future) the fact that by holding one coin I can interact with every bridgechain plus any ACES services
Matthew_DC [8:16 PM]
So what I am saying is that we have to be cautious of these kinds of decisions and ensure that we aren't inadvertently creating attack vectors to take down partners, businesses, and other industries using the technology.
I'm sorry guys, I have to go, but I would love to continue this conversation on Reddit or here at a later time.
mak [8:16 PM]
"all subsequent networks reliant on that consensus would be compromised as well"
^ Correction: only the VM chain will be compromised since I'm not advocating that all bridgechains should vote on the main chain.
Matthew_DC [8:19 PM]
In an isolated case, if we can map it out and vet the concept, I'm more than happy to hear it out and have the conversation.
Solowatch [8:19 PM]
So I think we can all agree an updated Whitepaper is due
Matthew_DC [8:20 PM]
This is a community project and we are shaping pieces of it together as we continue to build. We have already made changes based on community feedback on many occasions.
So I would love to see someone post a proposal to reddit or even as an AIP at some point that we could discuss.
Jarunik [8:20 PM]
If you write a white paper it will be outdated soon :smile:
Solowatch [8:21 PM]
Well a V2 whitepaper shouldn’t be outdated soon
I don’t care about a V1 or V1.5 whitepaper lol
I want a whitepaper for V2 that’s clearly explaining all these concerns that the community has
arkenstone [8:22 PM]
:this:
Solowatch [8:23 PM]
I wrote a few questions down that I’ll post in here later today that @rob [ Ark Labs ] asked for. Please add to it if I missed anything once I do.
arkenstone [8:23 PM]
And I think now it's the time do it. Present it with full package on mainet launch.. (edited)
Solowatch [8:23 PM]
Or PM and I’ll add them before posting
mak [8:25 PM]
Anyways thanks for listening and responding @Matthew_DC. Some of us have been trying to discuss this with the ark team but didn't get much feedback until today.
arigard [8:25 PM]
Yeah +1
arkenstone [8:28 PM]
Alot of early investors are getting worried
submitted by moazzam2k to ArkEcosystem [link] [comments]

Hijacking Bitcoin: Routing Attacks on Cryptocurrencies

arXiv:1605.07524
Date: 2017-03-24
Author(s): Maria Apostolaki, Aviv Zohar, Laurent Vanbever

Link to Paper


Abstract
As the most successful cryptocurrency to date, Bitcoin constitutes a target of choice for attackers. While many attack vectors have already been uncovered, one important vector has been left out though: attacking the currency via the Internet routing infrastructure itself. Indeed, by manipulating routing advertisements (BGP hijacks) or by naturally intercepting traffic, Autonomous Systems (ASes) can intercept and manipulate a large fraction of Bitcoin traffic. This paper presents the first taxonomy of routing attacks and their impact on Bitcoin, considering both small-scale attacks, targeting individual nodes, and large-scale attacks, targeting the network as a whole. While challenging, we show that two key properties make routing attacks practical: (i) the efficiency of routing manipulation; and (ii) the significant centralization of Bitcoin in terms of mining and routing. Specifically, we find that any network attacker can hijack few (<100) BGP prefixes to isolate ~50% of the mining power---even when considering that mining pools are heavily multi-homed. We also show that on-path network attackers can considerably slow down block propagation by interfering with few key Bitcoin messages. We demonstrate the feasibility of each attack against the deployed Bitcoin software. We also quantify their effectiveness on the current Bitcoin topology using data collected from a Bitcoin supernode combined with BGP routing data. The potential damage to Bitcoin is worrying. By isolating parts of the network or delaying block propagation, attackers can cause a significant amount of mining power to be wasted, leading to revenue losses and enabling a wide range of exploits such as double spending. To prevent such effects in practice, we provide both short and long-term countermeasures, some of which can be deployed immediately.

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[32] Y.-C. Hu, A. Perrig, and M. Sirbu, “SPV: Secure Path Vector Routing for Securing BGP,” ser. SIGCOMM ’04. New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2004, pp. 179–192.
[33] J. Karlin, S. Forrest, and J. Rexford, “Pretty Good BGP: Improving BGP by Cautiously Adopting Routes,” in Proceedings of the Proceedings of the 2006 IEEE International Conference on Network Protocols, ser. ICNP ’06. Washington, DC, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2006, pp. 290–299.
[34] E. K. Kogias, P. Jovanovic, N. Gailly, I. Khoffi, L. Gasser, and B. Ford, “Enhancing bitcoin security and performance with strong consistency via collective signing,” in 25th USENIX Security Symposium (USENIX Security 16). Austin, TX: USENIX Association, 2016, pp. 279–296.
[35] J. A. Kroll, I. C. Davey, and E. W. Felten, “The economics of bitcoin mining, or bitcoin in the presence of adversaries.” Citeseer.
[36] A. Miller, J. Litton, A. Pachulski, N. Gupta, D. Levin, N. Spring, and B. Bhattacharjee, “Discovering bitcoin’s public topology and influential nodes.”
[37] S. J. Murdoch and P. Zielinski, “Sampled traffic analysis by Internet- ´ exchange-level adversaries,” in Privacy Enhancing Technologies: 7th International Symposium, PET 2007, N. Borisov and P. Golle, Eds. Springer-Verlag, LNCS 4776, 2007, pp. 167–183.
[38] K. Nayak, S. Kumar, A. Miller, and E. Shi, “Stubborn mining: Generalizing selfish mining and combining with an eclipse attack,” IACR Cryptology ePrint Archive, vol. 2015, p. 796, 2015.
[39] T. Neudecker, P. Andelfinger, and H. Hartenstein, “A simulation model for analysis of attacks on the bitcoin peer-to-peer network,” in IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Internet Management. IEEE, 2015, pp. 1327–1332.
[40] P. v. Oorschot, T. Wan, and E. Kranakis, “On interdomain routing security and pretty secure bgp (psbgp),” ACM Trans. Inf. Syst. Secur., vol. 10, no. 3, Jul. 2007.
[41] A. Pilosov and T. Kapela, “Stealing The Internet. An Internet-Scale Man In The Middle Attack.” DEFCON 16.
[42] Y. Rekhter and T. Li, A Border Gateway Protocol 4 (BGP-4), IETF, Mar. 1995, rFC 1771.
[43] M. Rosenfeld, “Analysis of hashrate-based double spending,” arXiv preprint arXiv:1402.2009, 2014.
[44] A. Sapirshtein, Y. Sompolinsky, and A. Zohar, “Optimal selfish mining strategies in bitcoin,” CoRR, vol. abs/1507.06183, 2015.
[45] E. B. Sasson, A. Chiesa, C. Garman, M. Green, I. Miers, E. Tromer, and M. Virza, “Zerocash: Decentralized anonymous payments from bitcoin,” in 2014 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. IEEE, 2014, pp. 459–474.
[46] B. Schlinker, K. Zarifis, I. Cunha, N. Feamster, and E. Katz-Bassett, “Peering: An as for us,” in Proceedings of the 13th ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks, ser. HotNets-XIII. New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2014, pp. 18:1–18:7.
[47] J. Schnelli, “BIP 151: Peer-to-Peer Communication Encryption,” Mar. 2016, https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/mastebip-0151.mediawiki.
[48] X. Shi, Y. Xiang, Z. Wang, X. Yin, and J. Wu, “Detecting prefix hijackings in the Internet with Argus,” ser. IMC ’12. New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2012, pp. 15–28.
[49] Y. Sompolinsky and A. Zohar, “Secure high-rate transaction processing in bitcoin,” in Financial Cryptography and Data Security. Springer, 2015, pp. 507–527.
[50] Y. Sun, A. Edmundson, L. Vanbever, O. Li, J. Rexford, M. Chiang, and P. Mittal, “RAPTOR: Routing attacks on privacy in TOR.” in USENIX Security, 2015.
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submitted by dj-gutz to myrXiv [link] [comments]

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: After Butterfly Labs collapses, engineers find new jobs at 21 Inc.

BEGIN BLOG POST

After Butterfly Labs collapses, engineers find new jobs at 21 Inc.

A bitcoin miner has shipped on time. Yes, that is news. A new venture-capital backed company, 21 Inc., has released a miniature bitcoin miner that they call a "Bitcoin computer". For $399.99, you get a Raspberry Pi, an SHA-256 ASIC board, and a giant fan.
Again, this is news: normally, a manufacturer of bitcoin miners would overdesign and underengineer their equipment, or, if they managed to ship something functional, it would be so poorly engineered -- and over budget -- that it be an explosion waiting to happen and/or priced comparably to a four-door sedan.
21 Inc. has done something remarkable in the Bitcoin world: they started a company that operates like a legitimate business. They're even listed on Amazon.com, a company that's so strict with vendors that Nintendo was kicked off their system for not kissing enough customer ass.
Okay, enough with the praise.

This thing sucks.

The 21.co "computer" certainly deserves a place in the VC world, along with the other products consisting of wild promises and inane use cases. For the price of 4 Raspberry Pi computer kits, you get the following:
(If you have a remote desire to develop applications that use bitcoin, stop here. Go through that list and buy just those items above. You don't need anything else. If you're looking for comedy, or if you're a sucker with too much money, read on...)

Is that all I get for my money?

Those products alone don't allow you to make Bitcoin applications, apparently. You need these things, too:

How about the software demos?

It's difficult to justify developing a $400 computer that can't do much. So, to entice some customers, 21 Inc. included demos that try really hard to make customers feel inspired. Here are just a few things that 21 Inc. claims were totally impossible before their product existed:

What are the real customers saying?

The packaging is slick:
"This @21dotco computer came already opened..."
The hardware is reliable:
"...it must have lost power, which caused my SSH keys to become corrupted."
The software is revolutionary:
"...it will be more expensive to pay for your spotify subscription via your electricity bill, but a lot of people don't care."

I want to buy it anyway!

Go ahead. I won't stop you. Oh, and 21 Inc. doesn't accept bitcoins.
END BLOG POST
submitted by theirmoss to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Comparing Stratis and Lisk

Lisk and Stratis are decentralized application networks seeking to help companies implement blockchain solutions in their businesses. They rank 29th and 49th respectively in market cap according to CoinMarketCap. Lisk uses the LSK token and has a market cap of $317,726,131. As of Sunday, October 28th, the price of an LSK token was $2.85, down from an all-time high of $34.18 per token on February 17th, 2018. Stratis uses the STRAT token and has a market cap of $167,070,086. As of the same date, the price of a STRAT token was $1.69. The highest value the STRAT token ever reached was $21.48 per token on January 8th, 2018. Both tokens have seen a steady decline in their value since May. In this paper, I will compare Lisk and Stratis from a technical perspective, as the two platforms are designed to solve the same essential problem in slightly different ways. Lisk and Stratis are designed to solve the same core issue – the lack of flexibility developers face when building applications on established blockchains such as Bitcoin and Ethereum. Building blockchain applications on the Bitcoin or Ethereum network provides security for a new blockchain application, but this decision comes with a lot of baggage, including significant rigidity and unpredictability. Developers are limited in the applications they can develop and have no control over the future development of the network, as the Bitcoin or Ethereum community could decide to take the network in whichever way they see fit. Developers could create their own blockchains, fully customized to their exact needs, but this would come at a significant overhead cost and be prone to major security issues. Lisk and Stratis are both decentralized application networks on which developers can create fully customized blockchain applications without having to worry about the infrastructure costs and security issues associated with starting a new blockchain from scratch. Stratis is designed to enable companies to create their own private blockchains tailored to their exact needs through a blockchain-as-a-service business model. In the Stratis whitepaper, the Stratis team explains the main issue they are seeking to solve: the lack of a middle option between creating a brand new blockchain and developing an application on an existing network such as Ethereum or Bitcoin. The Stratis team saw that cloud computing is addressing a similar issue within the computing space and has found major success through allowing cloud services to be catered to each company’s needs without forcing companies to take on maintenance of the network themselves. Stratis has copied that business model by offering blockchain-as-a-service. Stratis will enable companies to create their own, fully customizable, private blockchains secured on the parent Stratis chain, allowing companies to take full advantage of blockchain solutions while not worrying about unnecessary overhead costs or security. Lisk is doing essentially the same thing without explicitly calling themselves a blockchain-as-a-service provider. Lisk offers a sidechain development kit for developers to build their own blockchain applications on sidechains off of the Lisk mainchain. Lisk’s sidechain development kit contains four main parts: Lisk Commander, Lisk Elements, Lisk Core and Lisk Hub. Using all four of them, developers can create decentralized sidechains fully customized to fit the needs of their company. After creating a sidechain, developers on Lisk can finish their blockchain applications by creating a user interface. Lisk also provides help in testing the blockchain application before deploying it. Before diving into the differences between Lisk and Stratis, it is important to recognize that because the two companies seek to solve the same issue in the same manner, they share most of their main features. For example, both provide toolkits with which developers can easily build blockchain applications tailored to their company’s needs. Both ensure security by linking the private blockchains built by companies to the main parent chain. Both allow for companies to create new tokens within their private blockchains, giving companies the opportunity to do an ICO on their platforms. Because of this, Lisk and Stratis mainly differ in only two key areas: coding language and consensus mechanism. Lisk and Stratis each saw the coding languages and consensus mechanisms present in Bitcoin and Ethereum as major problems they needed to fix in order to build a better decentralized application network. However, the two companies differ in their solution to these problems. Lisk and Stratis both recognized that a major problem with Ethereum is that it requires developers to code Ethereum-based blockchain applications in Solidity. Solidity is not a well-known coding language, and it limits developers’ abilities to customize blockchain applications. Though Ethereum’s use of solidity to code Ethereum-based blockchain applications led to a major improvement in developer capabilities when compared to Bitcoin’s original blockchain network, both Lisk and Stratis saw that the coding capabilities for blockchain applications could be improved even further. Lisk uses JavaScript, a much more well-known coding language than Solidity. In a medium post titled “What is Lisk? And What It Isn’t.” founder Max Kordek says “We chose JavaScript because it runs literally everywhere, is extremely popular & widespread, and has huge companies like Google or Microsoft working on its speed and security across a wide range of devices.” Kordek talks about JavaScript in-depth, beginning with the misconception that JavaScript is not a secure language. Kordek counters with the argument that although JavaScript is a weakly typed language, that does not make it inherently insecure. He argues that no matter what programming language is used, it is the developers’ job to make sure that the code they write is secure. Next, he discusses concerns regarding JavaScript’s known limitation on number precision larger than 32 bits. Kordek addresses this issue by explaining that Lisk has worked around JavaScript’s limitations on number precision by conducting integer-based arithmetic through the code base using BigNumber.js. By using BigNumber.js, a library for arbitrary-precision decimal and non-decimal arithmetic, the Lisk team has made sure that this limitation was never a problem. Kordek finishes this section of his medium post by explaining that the Lisk team is planning on eventually switching from JavaScript to TypeScript, a stronger coding language, to address concerns associated with the security of JavaScript code. Stratis, on the other hand, was developed in pure C#, referred to as “one of the dominant languages in business application development” in the Stratis whitepaper. Whereas Kordek’s explanation as to why Lisk chose JavaScript as their coding language centered more on the problems with Solidity, the Stratis team instead focused on the weaknesses of C++, the language Bitcoin Core is coded in. This is because Stratis decided to develop the Stratis Bitcoin Full Node on top of the NBitcoin platform as opposed to the Bitcoin Core platform. The Stratis whitepaper then goes on to list some of the advantages of using the NBitcoin platform. The first is that the NBitcoin platform is nearly identical to Bitcoin Core, but is written in C# and .NET, which make it easier to maintain and develop than the Bitcoin Core platform written in C++. The second is that higher-level engineers familiar with C++ are in short supply because the corporate world prefers higher-level languages, such as C#. The third is that higher-level languages are easier to review and learn, which in turn makes it harder for coding mistakes to make it to the final product. For a company deciding whether to build their blockchain application on Lisk or Stratis, the crux of their decision should be their preference for JavaScript or C#/.NET. Another area in which Lisk and Stratis differ is their choice of consensus mechanism. There are two major consensus mechanisms in the blockchain world right now: Proof of Work and Proof of Stake. Both Ethereum and Bitcoin use Proof of Work consensus mechanisms. In keeping with the theme of differentiation from Ethereum and Bitcoin, neither Lisk nor Stratis uses proof of work in their blockchain. The Proof of Work consensus mechanism used by Ethereum and Bitcoin require extensive overheads to be spent on mining equipment and electricity. Stratis and Lisk each sought to avoid hampering businesses using their platform with the need to incur these costs and therefore settled on different consensus mechanisms. In the Stratis whitepaper, the Stratis team states that they use a Proof of Stake approach to “align the interests of end-users (businesses) and those tasked with securing the network (full nodes).” Contrarily, the Lisk network doesn’t use Proof of Work or Proof of Stake, opting for a different consensus mechanism all together. Lisk’s consensus mechanism is derived from BitShares’ original consensus algorithm called Delegated Proof of Stake. In Lisk’s simplified version of BitShares’ original Delegated Proof of Stake, every LSK holder can vote for mainchain delegates to secure the network. At any given time, there can only be a maximum of 101 active mainchain delegates. These 101 active mainchain delegates have the most votes on the network. There is financial incentive to be an active mainchain delegate, as only these 101 members of the Lisk network can earn block generation rewards. Though this is a notable difference in the structure of the network, it is less likely than preference of coding language to be the most important factor in a company’s decision on which to use. Though Stratis and Lisk may seem like competitors because of their near identical value propositions, there is no fierce rivalry between the two companies. Both Stratis and Lisk are dedicated to not only the success of their platforms, but the success of blockchain use worldwide. In their whitepaper, the Stratis team discusses their plans for offering consulting services at their headquarters in London. The Stratis team states that “Stratis will leverage its own expertise by offering consultancy services to other businesses working in the sector, thereby driving forward blockchain adoption and forging key partnerships where opportunities are presented.” Moving outside of companies currently in the blockchain space, Stratis also vows to work with companies new to blockchain technology to identify potential use cases for blockchain within their company, helping organizations save money and increase efficiency. On top of this work, Stratis has set up an online tutorial to blockchain called Stratis Academy. This online academy provides a “Blockchain 101 Course” designed to educate those who know nothing about the technology. Lisk is playing its part in driving the adoption of blockchain technology through a similar online resource: Lisk Academy. The Lisk Academy’s mission is stated clearly on the homepage: “The Lisk Academy is a comprehensive and unbiased educational platform on blockchain technology. The whole Academy is free and open to everyone. The Lisk Academy is simply here to help you access the power of blockchain.” I can personally vouch for the effectiveness of the Lisk Academy, as the sections assigned to us for class readings earlier in the semester taught me, a person with next to zero knowledge of blockchain before taking this course, a great deal about the basics of the technology. I can also vouch for their claim that it is an unbiased platform, as I had learned a significant amount about blockchain through Lisk Academy before having any knowledge of what the Lisk product itself was. In conclusion, I believe that both Stratis and Lisk have the potential for success in the blockchain space. However, I also believe that their steadily decreasing token prices and low market caps are indicators of a high possibility of failure. With a new, supposedly “revolutionary”, blockchain idea gaining attention every day, it is extremely hard to make accurate assumptions as to which startups will still be in the picture ten years from now. Whether they are around a decade from now or not, Lisk and Stratis have both made meaningful contributions to the blockchain ecosystem, not only by creating platforms enabling companies to more easily integrate blockchain solutions into their businesses, but also by educating people of all knowledge levels on the technology underlying blockchain and the potential use cases for it.
Works Cited
Kordek, Max. “What Is Lisk? And What It Isn't. – Lisk Blog.” Lisk Blog, Lisk Blog, 26 July 2016, blog.lisk.io/what-is-lisk-and-what-it-isnt-e7b6b6188211.
“The Lisk Protocol.” Lisk, lisk.io/documentation/lisk-protocol.
Nyamwamu, Bebeto. “Beginner`s Guide: What Is Stratis? Blockchain-as-a-Service Platform.” 101 Blockchains, 101 Blockchains, 8 Aug. 2018, 101blockchains.com/what-is-stratis/.
Penny, Brian. “What Is Lisk? Introduction to LSK Token.” Crypto Briefing, 13 Sept. 2018, cryptobriefing.com/what-is-lisk-introduction-to-lsk/.
“Stratis Blockchain Solutions.” | STRATIS | The First Blockchain Developed for Businesses |Full POS, bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1512202.0.
Tre, Chris, et al. Stratis Whitepaper.
“Welcome to Stratis Academy.” Welcome to Stratis Academy - Stratis Academy Documentation, academy.stratisplatform.com/.
submitted by MainEggplant2 to u/MainEggplant2 [link] [comments]

10am Thu 10 May 2012 - /r/technology

  1. TIL why radio buttons are called radio buttons ginahoganedwards.files.wordpress.com comments technology
  2. Microsoft bans Firefox on ARM-based Windows: Raising the specter of last-generation browser battles, Mozilla launches a publicity campaign to seek a place for browsers besides IE on Windows devices using ARM chips news.cnet.com comments technology
  3. Netherlands passes net neutrality law, first among EU nations theverge.com comments technology
  4. Comparison of the Ink Inside HPs Cartridges Over the Years hpinkcartridges.co.uk comments technology
  5. VLC hits a billion downloads videolan.org comments technology
  6. DVDs and Blu-rays will now carry two unskippable government warnings arstechnica.com comments technology
  7. Play Wolfenstein 3D in your browser! wolfenstein.bethsoft.com comments technology
  8. Chappelle Show Creator Gives Grieving MCA Fans A Treat, Viacom Gives Them The Finger techdirt.com comments technology
  9. kickstarter: printxel 3d printer kickstarter.com comments technology
  10. Hey, Reddit. It's already WEDNESDAY, where is the promised montage and awareness push to oppose CISPA as one hivemind? Combined with this new FBI request for a 'backdoor' to spy on Twitter and Facebook users, Big Brother looms closer each day. youtube.com comments technology
  11. Facebook the Sellout: Can we Trust FB Anymore? danieljohnston.hubpages.com comments technology
  12. Kevin Smith's Approach To Competing With Piracy: Give Away A Ton, Then Sell Stuff That Can't Be Pirated techdirt.com comments technology
  13. Key Ruling In The Fight Over Artists Getting Their Copyrights Back Suggests The Labels May Be In Big Trouble techdirt.com comments technology
  14. FBI Fears Bitcoin’s Popularity with Criminals wired.com comments technology
  15. Machine Casts Phantom Votes in the Bronx, Invalidating Real Ones: Report wnyc.org comments technology
  16. You are being royally ripped off by your cell phone carrier. americablog.com comments technology
  17. X-rays probe world's oldest 'computer' [4:44] bbc.co.uk comments technology
  18. Password Protection Act: Ban bosses asking for Facebook passwords zdnet.com comments technology
  19. Your future hard drive might be grown with magnetic bacteria extremetech.com comments technology
  20. Adobe charges its users for fixing security vulnerabilities. adobe.com comments technology
  21. Big Oil Goes Mining for Big Data technologyreview.com comments technology
  22. The Pirate Bay Partners With Academic Researchers to Counter Propaganda torrentfreak.com comments technology
  23. How Teeny, Tiny Transistors Are Born in a Near-Total Vacuum - A new kind of manufacturing process cooked up by Applied Materials means we can finally sculpt chips from individual atoms. wired.com comments technology
  24. The CRTC is finally cracking-down on obscenely loud TV commercials. crtc.gc.ca comments technology
  25. Copyright protection is suggested to be cut from 70 to 20 years since the time of publication extratorrent.com comments technology
  26. Japanese Hobbyists Build 12ft Tall Piloted Mech io9.com comments technology
  27. Mark Zuckerberg has committed a big business-fashion faux-pas, say the very fashionable suits of Wall Street, who are chastising the nerd-turned-billionaire for wearing his hoodie on day one of his big IPO road-show. theatlanticwire.com comments technology
  28. Angry Birds Passes 1 Billion Download Mark theoverbyte.com comments technology
  29. Password Protection Act: Ban bosses asking for Facebook passwords zdnet.com comments technology
  30. DOJ: Requiring warrant for cell phone tracking would 'cripple' law enforcement blogs.computerworld.com comments technology
  31. Paralyzed woman completes London Marathon in robot suit news.cnet.com comments technology
  32. A paralyzed women finishes a marathon with the help of a bionic suit, for the first time in history. Anyone else excited to see what the future holds? news.uk.msn.com comments technology
  33. UK to introduce Internet Surveillance Bill...mmm.. guardian.co.uk comments technology
  34. Max-Planck Institute completes first instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope--an IR camera so sensitive it could see a candle on one of Jupiters moons azooptics.com comments technology
submitted by frontbot to fronttechnology [link] [comments]

9am Thu 10 May 2012 - /r/technology

  1. TIL why radio buttons are called radio buttons ginahoganedwards.files.wordpress.com comments technology
  2. Microsoft bans Firefox on ARM-based Windows: Raising the specter of last-generation browser battles, Mozilla launches a publicity campaign to seek a place for browsers besides IE on Windows devices using ARM chips news.cnet.com comments technology
  3. Netherlands passes net neutrality law, first among EU nations theverge.com comments technology
  4. Comparison of the Ink Inside HPs Cartridges Over the Years hpinkcartridges.co.uk comments technology
  5. VLC hits a billion downloads videolan.org comments technology
  6. DVDs and Blu-rays will now carry two unskippable government warnings arstechnica.com comments technology
  7. Play Wolfenstein 3D in your browser! wolfenstein.bethsoft.com comments technology
  8. Chappelle Show Creator Gives Grieving MCA Fans A Treat, Viacom Gives Them The Finger techdirt.com comments technology
  9. kickstarter: printxel 3d printer kickstarter.com comments technology
  10. Hey, Reddit. It's already WEDNESDAY, where is the promised montage and awareness push to oppose CISPA as one hivemind? Combined with this new FBI request for a 'backdoor' to spy on Twitter and Facebook users, Big Brother looms closer each day. youtube.com comments technology
  11. Facebook the Sellout: Can we Trust FB Anymore? danieljohnston.hubpages.com comments technology
  12. Kevin Smith's Approach To Competing With Piracy: Give Away A Ton, Then Sell Stuff That Can't Be Pirated techdirt.com comments technology
  13. Key Ruling In The Fight Over Artists Getting Their Copyrights Back Suggests The Labels May Be In Big Trouble techdirt.com comments technology
  14. Machine Casts Phantom Votes in the Bronx, Invalidating Real Ones: Report wnyc.org comments technology
  15. You are being royally ripped off by your cell phone carrier. americablog.com comments technology
  16. X-rays probe world's oldest 'computer' [4:44] bbc.co.uk comments technology
  17. Password Protection Act: Ban bosses asking for Facebook passwords zdnet.com comments technology
  18. Your future hard drive might be grown with magnetic bacteria extremetech.com comments technology
  19. Big Oil Goes Mining for Big Data technologyreview.com comments technology
  20. Japanese Hobbyists Build 12ft Tall Piloted Mech io9.com comments technology
  21. The Pirate Bay Partners With Academic Researchers to Counter Propaganda torrentfreak.com comments technology
  22. How Teeny, Tiny Transistors Are Born in a Near-Total Vacuum - A new kind of manufacturing process cooked up by Applied Materials means we can finally sculpt chips from individual atoms. wired.com comments technology
  23. The CRTC is finally cracking-down on obscenely loud TV commercials. crtc.gc.ca comments technology
  24. FBI Fears Bitcoin’s Popularity with Criminals wired.com comments technology
  25. Zuckerberg wears hoodie to I.P.O. meeting news.cnet.com comments technology
  26. Copyright protection is suggested to be cut from 70 to 20 years since the time of publication extratorrent.com comments technology
  27. Mark Zuckerberg has committed a big business-fashion faux-pas, say the very fashionable suits of Wall Street, who are chastising the nerd-turned-billionaire for wearing his hoodie on day one of his big IPO road-show. theatlanticwire.com comments technology
  28. Angry Birds Passes 1 Billion Download Mark theoverbyte.com comments technology
  29. Real-life Transformer! youtube.com comments technology
  30. DOJ: Requiring warrant for cell phone tracking would 'cripple' law enforcement blogs.computerworld.com comments technology
  31. Max-Planck Institute completes first instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope--an IR camera so sensitive it could see a candle on one of Jupiters moons azooptics.com comments technology
  32. Windows RT also only will run software delivered through Windows Update or the Windows Store. news.cnet.com comments technology
  33. UK to introduce Internet Surveillance Bill...mmm.. guardian.co.uk comments technology
  34. Honeywell's Lawsuit Against Nest: The Perfect Example Of Legacy Players Using Patents To Stifle Innovation techdirt.com comments technology
submitted by frontbot to fronttechnology [link] [comments]

1pm Thu 10 May 2012 - /r/technology

  1. TIL why radio buttons are called radio buttons ginahoganedwards.files.wordpress.com comments technology
  2. Microsoft bans Firefox on ARM-based Windows: Raising the specter of last-generation browser battles, Mozilla launches a publicity campaign to seek a place for browsers besides IE on Windows devices using ARM chips news.cnet.com comments technology
  3. Netherlands passes net neutrality law, first among EU nations theverge.com comments technology
  4. Comparison of the Ink Inside HPs Cartridges Over the Years hpinkcartridges.co.uk comments technology
  5. VLC hits a billion downloads videolan.org comments technology
  6. DVDs and Blu-rays will now carry two unskippable government warnings arstechnica.com comments technology
  7. Samsung buys streaming startup mSpot to take on iCloud and Google Play venturebeat.com comments technology
  8. After becoming the first European country to pass net neutrality into law yesterday, a court in The Hague has today ruled that Dutch internet providers UPC, KPN, Tele2, T-Mobile and Telfort must block access to The Pirate Bay. theverge.com comments technology
  9. Play Wolfenstein 3D in your browser! wolfenstein.bethsoft.com comments technology
  10. Adobe charges its users for fixing security vulnerabilities. adobe.com comments technology
  11. Kevin Smith's Approach To Competing With Piracy: Give Away A Ton, Then Sell Stuff That Can't Be Pirated techdirt.com comments technology
  12. Is Facebook over? Tagged.com overtakes giant for time spent per visit as 'social discovery' dailymail.co.uk comments technology
  13. Chappelle Show Creator Gives Grieving MCA Fans A Treat, Viacom Gives Them The Finger techdirt.com comments technology
  14. FBI Fears Bitcoin’s Popularity with Criminals wired.com comments technology
  15. kickstarter: printxel 3d printer kickstarter.com comments technology
  16. Hey, Reddit. It's already WEDNESDAY, where is the promised montage and awareness push to oppose CISPA as one hivemind? Combined with this new FBI request for a 'backdoor' to spy on Twitter and Facebook users, Big Brother looms closer each day. youtube.com comments technology
  17. James Webb telescope's Mid-Infrared Instrument is ready to ship. MIRI will allow the JWT to look out into space and back in time to more than 13 billion years ago. bbc.co.uk comments technology
  18. Facebook the Sellout: Can we Trust FB Anymore? danieljohnston.hubpages.com comments technology
  19. Key Ruling In The Fight Over Artists Getting Their Copyrights Back Suggests The Labels May Be In Big Trouble techdirt.com comments technology
  20. X-rays probe world's oldest 'computer' [4:44] bbc.co.uk comments technology
  21. Dutch court orders more Dutch ISP's to block TPB torrentfreak.com comments technology
  22. Machine Casts Phantom Votes in the Bronx, Invalidating Real Ones: Report wnyc.org comments technology
  23. You are being royally ripped off by your cell phone carrier. americablog.com comments technology
  24. Password Protection Act: Ban bosses asking for Facebook passwords zdnet.com comments technology
  25. Miami Zoo orangutans use iPads to communicate wired.co.uk comments technology
  26. Your future hard drive might be grown with magnetic bacteria extremetech.com comments technology
  27. The Pirate Bay Partners With Academic Researchers to Counter Propaganda torrentfreak.com comments technology
  28. The CRTC is finally cracking-down on obscenely loud TV commercials. crtc.gc.ca comments technology
  29. How Teeny, Tiny Transistors Are Born in a Near-Total Vacuum - A new kind of manufacturing process cooked up by Applied Materials means we can finally sculpt chips from individual atoms. wired.com comments technology
  30. Alliant Techsystems surprises with an entry in the competition to carry crew to the International Space Station. arstechnica.com comments technology
  31. uStream FoundeCEO: “It was the most complex cyberattack that we have ever seen...This is fundamental to preserving freedom of speech and assembly on the Internet.” (xpost from worldnews) thelede.blogs.nytimes.com comments technology
  32. Big Oil Goes Mining for Big Data technologyreview.com comments technology
  33. Copyright protection is suggested to be cut from 70 to 20 years since the time of publication extratorrent.com comments technology
submitted by frontbot to fronttechnology [link] [comments]

12pm Thu 10 May 2012 - /r/technology

  1. TIL why radio buttons are called radio buttons ginahoganedwards.files.wordpress.com comments technology
  2. Microsoft bans Firefox on ARM-based Windows: Raising the specter of last-generation browser battles, Mozilla launches a publicity campaign to seek a place for browsers besides IE on Windows devices using ARM chips news.cnet.com comments technology
  3. Netherlands passes net neutrality law, first among EU nations theverge.com comments technology
  4. Comparison of the Ink Inside HPs Cartridges Over the Years hpinkcartridges.co.uk comments technology
  5. VLC hits a billion downloads videolan.org comments technology
  6. DVDs and Blu-rays will now carry two unskippable government warnings arstechnica.com comments technology
  7. Play Wolfenstein 3D in your browser! wolfenstein.bethsoft.com comments technology
  8. Chappelle Show Creator Gives Grieving MCA Fans A Treat, Viacom Gives Them The Finger techdirt.com comments technology
  9. Kevin Smith's Approach To Competing With Piracy: Give Away A Ton, Then Sell Stuff That Can't Be Pirated techdirt.com comments technology
  10. kickstarter: printxel 3d printer kickstarter.com comments technology
  11. Adobe charges its users for fixing security vulnerabilities. adobe.com comments technology
  12. Hey, Reddit. It's already WEDNESDAY, where is the promised montage and awareness push to oppose CISPA as one hivemind? Combined with this new FBI request for a 'backdoor' to spy on Twitter and Facebook users, Big Brother looms closer each day. youtube.com comments technology
  13. FBI Fears Bitcoin’s Popularity with Criminals wired.com comments technology
  14. Facebook the Sellout: Can we Trust FB Anymore? danieljohnston.hubpages.com comments technology
  15. After becoming the first European country to pass net neutrality into law yesterday, a court in The Hague has today ruled that Dutch internet providers UPC, KPN, Tele2, T-Mobile and Telfort must block access to The Pirate Bay. theverge.com comments technology
  16. Key Ruling In The Fight Over Artists Getting Their Copyrights Back Suggests The Labels May Be In Big Trouble techdirt.com comments technology
  17. Samsung buys streaming startup mSpot to take on iCloud and Google Play venturebeat.com comments technology
  18. Machine Casts Phantom Votes in the Bronx, Invalidating Real Ones: Report wnyc.org comments technology
  19. X-rays probe world's oldest 'computer' [4:44] bbc.co.uk comments technology
  20. You are being royally ripped off by your cell phone carrier. americablog.com comments technology
  21. FBI Warning: Don't Update Software on the Road securitywatch.pcmag.com comments technology
  22. Password Protection Act: Ban bosses asking for Facebook passwords zdnet.com comments technology
  23. Miami Zoo orangutans use iPads to communicate wired.co.uk comments technology
  24. Your future hard drive might be grown with magnetic bacteria extremetech.com comments technology
  25. The Pirate Bay Partners With Academic Researchers to Counter Propaganda torrentfreak.com comments technology
  26. HP print cartridges through the ages, a slow-motion ripoff boingboing.net comments technology
  27. Big Oil Goes Mining for Big Data technologyreview.com comments technology
  28. The CRTC is finally cracking-down on obscenely loud TV commercials. crtc.gc.ca comments technology
  29. How Teeny, Tiny Transistors Are Born in a Near-Total Vacuum - A new kind of manufacturing process cooked up by Applied Materials means we can finally sculpt chips from individual atoms. wired.com comments technology
  30. Sony reports record loss google.com comments technology
  31. Copyright protection is suggested to be cut from 70 to 20 years since the time of publication extratorrent.com comments technology
  32. Mark Zuckerberg has committed a big business-fashion faux-pas, say the very fashionable suits of Wall Street, who are chastising the nerd-turned-billionaire for wearing his hoodie on day one of his big IPO road-show. theatlanticwire.com comments technology
  33. Computing fossils: Old tech holding on for dear life itworld.com comments technology
  34. Dutch court orders more Dutch ISP's to block TPB torrentfreak.com comments technology
  35. Etsy Raises $40 Million for International Expansion bits.blogs.nytimes.com comments technology
submitted by frontbot to fronttechnology [link] [comments]

2pm Thu 10 May 2012 - /r/technology

  1. TIL why radio buttons are called radio buttons ginahoganedwards.files.wordpress.com comments technology
  2. Microsoft bans Firefox on ARM-based Windows: Raising the specter of last-generation browser battles, Mozilla launches a publicity campaign to seek a place for browsers besides IE on Windows devices using ARM chips news.cnet.com comments technology
  3. Netherlands passes net neutrality law, first among EU nations theverge.com comments technology
  4. Comparison of the Ink Inside HPs Cartridges Over the Years hpinkcartridges.co.uk comments technology
  5. After becoming the first European country to pass net neutrality into law yesterday, a court in The Hague has today ruled that Dutch internet providers UPC, KPN, Tele2, T-Mobile and Telfort must block access to The Pirate Bay. theverge.com comments technology
  6. VLC hits a billion downloads videolan.org comments technology
  7. Samsung buys streaming startup mSpot to take on iCloud and Google Play venturebeat.com comments technology
  8. DVDs and Blu-rays will now carry two unskippable government warnings arstechnica.com comments technology
  9. Adobe charges its users for fixing security vulnerabilities. adobe.com comments technology
  10. Kevin Smith's Approach To Competing With Piracy: Give Away A Ton, Then Sell Stuff That Can't Be Pirated techdirt.com comments technology
  11. Is Facebook over? Tagged.com overtakes giant for time spent per visit as 'social discovery' dailymail.co.uk comments technology
  12. Play Wolfenstein 3D in your browser! wolfenstein.bethsoft.com comments technology
  13. FBI Fears Bitcoin’s Popularity with Criminals wired.com comments technology
  14. Chappelle Show Creator Gives Grieving MCA Fans A Treat, Viacom Gives Them The Finger techdirt.com comments technology
  15. kickstarter: printxel 3d printer kickstarter.com comments technology
  16. Hey, Reddit. It's already WEDNESDAY, where is the promised montage and awareness push to oppose CISPA as one hivemind? Combined with this new FBI request for a 'backdoor' to spy on Twitter and Facebook users, Big Brother looms closer each day. youtube.com comments technology
  17. James Webb telescope's Mid-Infrared Instrument is ready to ship. MIRI will allow the JWT to look out into space and back in time to more than 13 billion years ago. bbc.co.uk comments technology
  18. Alliant Techsystems surprises with an entry in the competition to carry crew to the International Space Station. arstechnica.com comments technology
  19. Facebook the Sellout: Can we Trust FB Anymore? danieljohnston.hubpages.com comments technology
  20. Dutch court orders more Dutch ISP's to block TPB torrentfreak.com comments technology
  21. 10 Ridiculously Unsettling Old-Timey Robots io9.com comments technology
  22. X-rays probe world's oldest 'computer' [4:44] bbc.co.uk comments technology
  23. Key Ruling In The Fight Over Artists Getting Their Copyrights Back Suggests The Labels May Be In Big Trouble techdirt.com comments technology
  24. Machine Casts Phantom Votes in the Bronx, Invalidating Real Ones: Report wnyc.org comments technology
  25. You are being royally ripped off by your cell phone carrier. americablog.com comments technology
  26. Password Protection Act: Ban bosses asking for Facebook passwords zdnet.com comments technology
  27. Your future hard drive might be grown with magnetic bacteria extremetech.com comments technology
  28. The Pirate Bay Partners With Academic Researchers to Counter Propaganda torrentfreak.com comments technology
  29. The CRTC is finally cracking-down on obscenely loud TV commercials. crtc.gc.ca comments technology
  30. How Teeny, Tiny Transistors Are Born in a Near-Total Vacuum - A new kind of manufacturing process cooked up by Applied Materials means we can finally sculpt chips from individual atoms. wired.com comments technology
  31. uStream FoundeCEO: “It was the most complex cyberattack that we have ever seen...This is fundamental to preserving freedom of speech and assembly on the Internet.” (xpost from worldnews) thelede.blogs.nytimes.com comments technology
  32. Miami Zoo orangutans use iPads to communicate wired.co.uk comments technology
  33. Big Oil Goes Mining for Big Data technologyreview.com comments technology
  34. Copyright protection is suggested to be cut from 70 to 20 years since the time of publication extratorrent.com comments technology
submitted by frontbot to fronttechnology [link] [comments]

11am Thu 10 May 2012 - /r/technology

  1. TIL why radio buttons are called radio buttons ginahoganedwards.files.wordpress.com comments technology
  2. Microsoft bans Firefox on ARM-based Windows: Raising the specter of last-generation browser battles, Mozilla launches a publicity campaign to seek a place for browsers besides IE on Windows devices using ARM chips news.cnet.com comments technology
  3. Netherlands passes net neutrality law, first among EU nations theverge.com comments technology
  4. Comparison of the Ink Inside HPs Cartridges Over the Years hpinkcartridges.co.uk comments technology
  5. VLC hits a billion downloads videolan.org comments technology
  6. DVDs and Blu-rays will now carry two unskippable government warnings arstechnica.com comments technology
  7. Play Wolfenstein 3D in your browser! wolfenstein.bethsoft.com comments technology
  8. Chappelle Show Creator Gives Grieving MCA Fans A Treat, Viacom Gives Them The Finger techdirt.com comments technology
  9. Kevin Smith's Approach To Competing With Piracy: Give Away A Ton, Then Sell Stuff That Can't Be Pirated techdirt.com comments technology
  10. kickstarter: printxel 3d printer kickstarter.com comments technology
  11. Hey, Reddit. It's already WEDNESDAY, where is the promised montage and awareness push to oppose CISPA as one hivemind? Combined with this new FBI request for a 'backdoor' to spy on Twitter and Facebook users, Big Brother looms closer each day. youtube.com comments technology
  12. Facebook the Sellout: Can we Trust FB Anymore? danieljohnston.hubpages.com comments technology
  13. FBI Fears Bitcoin’s Popularity with Criminals wired.com comments technology
  14. Adobe charges its users for fixing security vulnerabilities. adobe.com comments technology
  15. Key Ruling In The Fight Over Artists Getting Their Copyrights Back Suggests The Labels May Be In Big Trouble techdirt.com comments technology
  16. Machine Casts Phantom Votes in the Bronx, Invalidating Real Ones: Report wnyc.org comments technology
  17. X-rays probe world's oldest 'computer' [4:44] bbc.co.uk comments technology
  18. You are being royally ripped off by your cell phone carrier. americablog.com comments technology
  19. FBI Warning: Don't Update Software on the Road securitywatch.pcmag.com comments technology
  20. Password Protection Act: Ban bosses asking for Facebook passwords zdnet.com comments technology
  21. Your future hard drive might be grown with magnetic bacteria extremetech.com comments technology
  22. After becoming the first European country to pass net neutrality into law yesterday, a court in The Hague has today ruled that Dutch internet providers UPC, KPN, Tele2, T-Mobile and Telfort must block access to The Pirate Bay. theverge.com comments technology
  23. HP print cartridges through the ages, a slow-motion ripoff boingboing.net comments technology
  24. The Pirate Bay Partners With Academic Researchers to Counter Propaganda torrentfreak.com comments technology
  25. Big Oil Goes Mining for Big Data technologyreview.com comments technology
  26. The CRTC is finally cracking-down on obscenely loud TV commercials. crtc.gc.ca comments technology
  27. How Teeny, Tiny Transistors Are Born in a Near-Total Vacuum - A new kind of manufacturing process cooked up by Applied Materials means we can finally sculpt chips from individual atoms. wired.com comments technology
  28. Copyright protection is suggested to be cut from 70 to 20 years since the time of publication extratorrent.com comments technology
  29. Mark Zuckerberg has committed a big business-fashion faux-pas, say the very fashionable suits of Wall Street, who are chastising the nerd-turned-billionaire for wearing his hoodie on day one of his big IPO road-show. theatlanticwire.com comments technology
  30. Dutch court orders more Dutch ISP's to block TPB torrentfreak.com comments technology
  31. Soca website attack: Norway arrests two youths bbc.com comments technology
  32. Angry Birds Passes 1 Billion Download Mark theoverbyte.com comments technology
  33. uStream FoundeCEO: “It was the most complex cyberattack that we have ever seen...This is fundamental to preserving freedom of speech and assembly on the Internet.” (xpost from worldnews) thelede.blogs.nytimes.com comments technology
  34. Password Protection Act: Ban bosses asking for Facebook passwords zdnet.com comments technology
submitted by frontbot to fronttechnology [link] [comments]

Minergate Mining Cryptocurrency on your own computer How to mine $1,000,000 of Bitcoin using just a laptop ... BITCOIN MINING WITH SOLAR KIT! - Gmod DarkRP Life (Overclocking Server Processors Over 7 Gigahertz) How to start Bitcoin mining for beginners (SUPER EASY ... Buying a $800 Pre-built Bitcoin Cryptocurrency Mining Rig ...

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Minergate Mining Cryptocurrency on your own computer

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