::NikaiNoya Hacks & Cheats::: Medal of Honor (2010) Hack ...

Complete Guide to All r/neoliberal Flair Personalities [J-L]

Please see the first post [A-I] for more info about this post. Unfortunately, post character limit is 40k, so I will have to break this into multiple posts linked here:

[A-I]

[J-L]

[M-P]

[Q-Z]


James Heckman
1944 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Professor in Economics at the University of Chicago. Professor at the Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies. Director of the Center for the Economics of Human Development (CEHD). Co-Director of Human Capital and Economic Opportunity (HCEO) Global Working Group. Heckman is also a Professor of Law at ‘the Law School’, a senior research fellow at the American Bar Foundation, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.
· In 2000, Heckman shared the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with Daniel McFadden, for his pioneering work in econometrics and microeconomics.
· As of February 2019 (according to RePEc), he is the next most influential economist in the world behind Daniel McFadden.
· Heckman has received numerous awards for his work, including the John Bates Clark Medal of the American Economic Association in 1983, the 2005 and 2007 Dennis Aigner Award for Applied Econometrics from the Journal of Econometrics, the 2005 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Achievement in Labor Economics, the 2005 Ulysses Medal from the University College Dublin, the 2007 Theodore W. Schultz Award from the American Agricultural Economics Association, the Gold Medal of the President of the Italian Republic awarded by the International Scientific Committee of the Pio Manzú Centre in 2008, the Distinguished Contributions to Public Policy for Children Award from the Society for Research in Child Development in 2009, the 2014 Frisch Medal from the Econometric Society, the 2014 Spirit of Erikson Award from the Erikson Institute, and the 2016 Dan David Prize for Combating Poverty from Tel Aviv University.
“The best way to improve the American workforce in the 21st century is to invest in early childhood education, to ensure that even the most disadvantaged children have the opportunity to succeed alongside their more advantaged peers”

Janet Yellen
1945 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Successor to Ben Bernanke, serving as the Chair of the Federal Reserve from 2014 to 2018, and as Vice Chair from 2010 to 2014, following her position as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Yellen was also Chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers under President Bill Clinton.
· Yellen is a Keynesian economist and advocates the use of monetary policy in stabilizing economic activity over the business cycle. She believes in the modern version of the Phillips curve, which originally was an observation about an inverse relationship between unemployment and inflation. In her 2010 nomination hearing for Vice Chair of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, Yellen said, “The modern version of the Phillips curve model—relating movements in inflation to the degree of slack in the economy—has solid theoretical and empirical support.”
· Yellen is married to George Akerlof, another notable economist, Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences laureate, professor at Georgetown University and the University of California, Berkeley..
· In 2014, Yellen was named by Forbes as the second most powerful woman in the world. She was the highest ranking American on the list. In October 2015, Bloomberg Markets ranked her first in their annual list of the 50 most influential economists and policymakers. In October 2015, Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute ranked Yellen #1 in the Public Investor 100 list. In October 2010, she received the Adam Smith Award from the National Association for Business Economics (NABE).
“In the long run, outsourcing is another form of trade that benefits the U.S. economy by giving us cheaper ways to do things.”
“I'm just opposed to a pure inflation-only mandate in which the only thing a central bank cares about is inflation and not unemployment.”

Jared Polis
1975 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· 43rd governor of Colorado since January 2019. Polis served on the Colorado State Board of Education from 2001 to 2007 and was the United States Representative for Colorado's 2nd congressional district from 2009 to 2019.
· Polis is the first openly gay person and second openly LGBT person (after Kate Brown of Oregon) to be elected governor in the United States.
· In 2000 Polis founded the Jared Polis Foundation, whose mission is to “create opportunities for success by supporting educators, increasing access to technology, and strengthening our community.” Polis has also founded two charter schools.
· Polis was named Outstanding Philanthropist for the 2006 National Philanthropy Day in Colorado. He has received many awards, including the Boulder Daily Camera's 2007 Pacesetter Award in Education; the Kauffman Foundation Community Award; the Denver consul general of Mexico “Ohtli”; the Martin Luther King Jr. Colorado Humanitarian Award; and the Anti-Defamation League's inaugural Boulder Community Builder Award.
“Having alternative currencies is great, right, because, historically, government's had a monopoly on currency. At the end of the day, why should only politicians—either directly or indirectly—control the currency? We can reduce transaction cost, provide an alternative, and—look, I don't know whether it'll be Bitcoin or not—but I think the concept of digital currencies is here to stay, and the fact that a politician would write to try to ban them in their infancy is just the wrong way to go about it. Let the market determine whether there's any value there or not.”

Jeff Bezos
1964 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Best known as the founder, CEO, and president of Amazon, Bezos is an American internet and aerospace entrepreneur, media proprietor, and investor. The first centi-billionaire on the Forbes wealth index, Bezos was named the “richest man in modern history” after his net worth increased to $150 billion in July 2018. In September 2018, Forbes described him as “far richer than anyone else on the planet” as he added $1.8 billion to his net worth when Amazon became the second company in history to reach a market cap of $1 trillion.
· Bezos supported the electoral campaigns of U.S. senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, two Democratic U.S. senators from Washington. He has also supported U.S. representative John Conyers, as well as Patrick Leahy and Spencer Abraham, U.S. senators serving on committees dealing with Internet-related issues.
· Bezos has supported the legalization of same-sex marriage, and in 2012 contributed $2.5 million to a group supporting a yes vote on Washington Referendum 74, which affirmed same-sex marriage.
· After the 2016 presidential election, Bezos was invited to join Donald Trump's Defense Innovation Advisory Board, an advisory council to improve the technology used by the Defense Department. Bezos declined the offer without further comment.
· In September 2018, Business Insider reported that Bezos was the only one of the top five billionaires in the world who had not signed the Giving Pledge, an initiative created by Bill Gates and Warren Buffett that encourage wealthy people to give away their wealth.
“Percentage margins don't matter. What matters always is dollar margins: the actual dollar amount. Companies are valued not on their percentage margins, but on how many dollars they actually make, and a multiple of that.”
“We have the resources to build room for a trillion humans in this solar system, and when we have a trillion humans, we'll have a thousand Einsteins and a thousand Mozarts. It will be a way more interesting place to live.”

Jens Weidmann
1968 – Present Born: Germany Resides: Germany
· German economist and president of the Deutsche Bundesbank. Chairman of the Board of the Bank for International Settlements. From 1997 to 1999, Weidmann worked at the International Monetary Fund. In 2006, he began serving as Head of Division IV (Economic and Financial Policy) in the Federal Chancellery. He was the chief negotiator of the Federal Republic of Germany for both the summits of the G8 and the G20. He was given the 2016 Medal for Extraordinary Merits for Bavaria in a United Europe.
· Weidmann was involved in a series of major decisions in response to the financial crisis in Germany and Europe: preventing the meltdown of the bank Hypo Real Estate, guaranteeing German deposits and implementing a rescue programme for the banking system, piecing together two fiscal-stimulus programmes, and setting up the Greek bail-out package and the European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF).
· In a 2011 speech, Weidmann criticized the errors and “many years of wrong developments” of the European Monetary Union (EMU) peripheral states, particularly the wasted opportunity represented by their “disproportionate investment in private home-building, high government spending or private consumption”. In May, 2012, Weidmann's stance was characterized by US economist and columnist Paul Krugman as amounting to wanting to destroy the Euro. In 2016, Weidmann dismissed deflation in light of the European Central Bank's current stimulus program, pointing out the healthy condition of the German economy and that the euro area is not that bad off.
“I share the concerns regarding monetary policy that is too loose for too long. … As you know I have concerns about granting emergency liquidity on account of the fact that the banks are not doing everything to improve their liquidity situation.”

Jerome Powell
1953 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Current Chair of the Federal Reserve, nominated by Trump. Powell has faced substantial and repeated criticism from Trump after his confirmation. The Senate Banking Committee approved Powell's nomination in a 22–1 vote, with Senator Elizabeth Warren casting the lone dissenting vote.
· Powell briefly served as Under Secretary of the Treasury for Domestic Finance under George H. W. Bush in 1992. He has served as a member of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors since 2012. He is the first Chair of the Federal Reserve since 1987 not to hold a Ph.D. degree in Economics.
· Powell has described the Fed's role as nonpartisan and apolitical. Trump has criticized Powell for not massively lowering federal interest rates and instituting quantitative easing.
· The Bloomberg Intelligence Fed Spectrometer rated Powell as neutral (not dove nor hawk). Powell has been a skeptic of round 3 of quantitative easing, initiated in 2012, although he did vote in favor of implementation.
· Powell stated that higher capital and liquidity requirements and stress tests have made the financial system safer and must be preserved. However, he also stated that the Volcker Rule should be re-written to exclude smaller banks. Powell supports ample amounts of private capital to support housing finance activities.
“The Fed's organization reflects a long-standing desire in American history to ensure that power over our nation's monetary policy and financial system is not concentrated in a few hands, whether in Washington or in high finance or in any single group or constituency.”

John Cochrane
1957 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and economist, specializing in financial economics and macroeconomics.
· The central idea of Cochrane's research is that macroeconomics and finance should be linked, and a comprehensive theory needs to explain both 1.) how, given the observed prices and financial returns, households and firms decide on consumption, investment, and financing; and 2.) how, in equilibrium, prices and financial returns are determined by households and firms decisions.
· Cochrane is the author of ‘Asset Pricing,’ a widely used textbook in graduate courses on asset pricing. According to his own words, the organizing principle of the book is that everything can be traced back to specializations of a single equation: the basic pricing equation. Cochrane received the TIAA-CREF Institute Paul A. Samuelson Award for this book.
“Regulators and politicians aren’t nitwits. The libertarian argument that regulation is so dumb — which it surely is — misses the point that it is enacted by really smart people. The fact that the regulatory state is an ideal tool for the entrenchment of political power was surely not missed by its architects.”

John Keynes (John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes)
1883 – 1946 Born: England Died: England
· British economist, whose ideas fundamentally changed the theory and practice of macroeconomics and the economic policies of governments. Originally trained in mathematics, he built on and greatly refined earlier work on the causes of business cycles, and was one of the most influential economists of the 20th century. Widely considered the founder of modern macroeconomics, his ideas are the basis for the school of thought known as Keynesian economics, and its various offshoots. Keynes was a lifelong member of the Liberal Party, which until the 1920s had been one of the two main political parties in the United Kingdom.
· During the 1930s Great Depression, Keynes challenged the ideas of neoclassical economics that held that free markets would, in the short to medium term, automatically provide full employment, as long as workers were flexible in their wage demands. He argued that aggregate demand (total spending in the economy) determined the overall level of economic activity, and that inadequate aggregate demand could lead to prolonged periods of high unemployment. Keynes advocated the use of fiscal and monetary policies to mitigate the adverse effects of economic recessions and depressions.
· Keynes's influence started to wane in the 1970s, his ideas challenged by those who disputed the ability of government to favorably regulate the business cycle with fiscal policy. However, the advent of the global financial crisis of 2007–2008 sparked a resurgence in Keynesian thought. Keynesian economics provided the theoretical underpinning for economic policies undertaken in response to the crisis by President Barack Obama of the United States, Prime Minister Gordon Brown of the United Kingdom, and other heads of governments.
· Keynes was vice-chairman of the Marie Stopes Society which provided birth control education and campaigned against job discrimination against women and unequal pay. He was an outspoken critic of laws against homosexuality. Keynes thought that the pursuit of money for its own sake was a pathological condition, and that the proper aim of work is to provide leisure. He wanted shorter working hours and longer holidays for all. Keynes was ultimately a successful investor, building up a private fortune.
“How can I accept the Communist doctrine, which sets up as its bible, above and beyond criticism, an obsolete textbook which I know not only to be scientifically erroneous but without interest or application to the modern world? How can I adopt a creed which, preferring the mud to the fish, exalts the boorish proletariat above the bourgeoisie and the intelligentsia, who with all their faults, are the quality of life and surely carry the seeds of all human achievement? Even if we need a religion, how can we find it in the turbid rubbish of the red bookshop? It is hard for an educated, decent, intelligent son of Western Europe to find his ideals here, unless he has first suffered some strange and horrid process of conversion which has changed all his values.”

John Locke
1632 – 1704 Born: England Died: England
· Known as the “Father of Liberalism,” Locke was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers. His work greatly affected the development of epistemology and political philosophy. His writings influenced Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, many Scottish Enlightenment thinkers, as well as the American revolutionaries. His contributions to classical republicanism and liberal theory are reflected in the United States Declaration of Independence.
· Locke's political theory was founded on social contract theory. Social contract arguments typically posit that individuals have consented, either explicitly or tacitly, to surrender some of their freedoms and submit to the authority (of the ruler, or to the decision of a majority) in exchange for protection of their remaining rights or maintenance of the social order.
· Locke advocated for governmental separation of powers and believed that revolution is not only a right but an obligation in some circumstances. Locke was vehemently opposed to slavery, calling it “vile and miserable … directly opposite to the generous Temper and Courage of our Nation.”
· Locke uses the word “property” in both broad and narrow senses. In a broad sense, it covers a wide range of human interests and aspirations; more narrowly, it refers to material goods. He argues that property is a natural right and it is derived from labour aand that the individual ownership of goods and property is justified by the labour exerted to produce those goods
· According to Locke, unused property is wasteful and an offence against nature, but, with the introduction of “durable” goods, men could exchange their excessive perishable goods for goods that would last longer and thus not offend the natural law. In his view, the introduction of money marks the culmination of this process, making possible the unlimited accumulation of property without causing waste through spoilage.
“The power of the legislative, being derived from the people by a positive voluntary grant and institution, can be no other than what that positive grant conveyed, which being only to make laws, and not to make legislators, the legislative can have no power to transfer their authority of making laws, and place it in other hands.”
“No man in civil society can be exempted from the laws of it: for if any man may do what he thinks fit, and there be no appeal on earth, for redress or security against any harm he shall do; I ask, whether he be not perfectly still in the state of nature, and so can be no part or member of that civil society; unless any one will say, the state of nature and civil society are one and the same thing, which I have never yet found any one so great a patron of anarchy as to affirm.”

John Mill (John Stuart Mill a.k.a. J. S. Mill)
1806 – 1873 Born: England Died: France
· John Stuart Mill was arguably the most influential English speaking philosopher of the nineteenth century. He was a naturalist, a utilitarian, and a liberal, whose work explores the consequences of a thoroughgoing empiricist outlook. In doing so, he sought to combine the best of eighteenth-century Enlightenment thinking with newly emerging currents of nineteenth-century Romantic and historical philosophy. His most important works include System of Logic (1843), On Liberty (1859), Utilitarianism (1861) and An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1865).
· Mill's conception of liberty justified the freedom of the individual in opposition to unlimited state and social control. A member of the Liberal Party and author of the early feminist work The Subjection of Women (in which he also condemned slavery), he was also the second Member of Parliament to call for women's suffrage after Henry Hunt in 1832.
· Mill, an employee for the British East India Company from 1823 to 1858, argued in support of what he called a “benevolent despotism” with regard to the colonies. Mill argued that “To suppose that the same international customs, and the same rules of international morality, can obtain between one civilized nation and another, and between civilized nations and barbarians, is a grave error. ... To characterize any conduct whatever towards a barbarous people as a violation of the law of nations, only shows that he who so speaks has never considered the subject.”
· John Stuart Mill believed in the philosophy of Utilitarianism, which he described as the principle that holds “that actions are right in the proportion as they tend to promote happiness [intended pleasure, and the absence of pain], wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness [pain, and the privation of pleasure].” Mill asserts that even when we value virtues for selfish reasons we are in fact cherishing them as a part of our happiness.
· Mill's early economic philosophy was one of free markets. However, he accepted interventions in the economy, such as a tax on alcohol, if there were sufficient utilitarian grounds. Mill originally believed that “equality of taxation” meant “equality of sacrifice” and that progressive taxation penalized those who worked harder and saved more. Given an equal tax rate regardless of income, Mill agreed that inheritance should be taxed.
· His main objection of socialism was on that of what he saw its destruction of competition. According to Mill, a socialist society would only be attainable through the provision of basic education for all, promoting economic democracy instead of capitalism, in the manner of substituting capitalist businesses with worker cooperatives.
· Mill's major work on political democracy defends two fundamental principles at slight odds with each other: extensive participation by citizens and enlightened competence of rulers. He believed that the incompetence of the masses could eventually be overcome if they were given a chance to take part in politics, especially at the local level.
· Mill is one of the few political philosophers ever to serve in government as an elected official. In his three years in Parliament, he was more willing to compromise than the “radical” principles expressed in his writing would lead one to expect.
“He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them. But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion... Nor is it enough that he should hear the opinions of adversaries from his own teachers, presented as they state them, and accompanied by what they offer as refutations. He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them...he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.”
“The only freedom which deserves the name is that of pursuing our own good in our own way, so long as we do not attempt to deprive others of theirs, or impede their efforts to obtain it. Each is the proper guardian of his own health, whether bodily, or mental or spiritual. Mankind are greater gainers by suffering each other to live as seems good to themselves, than by compelling each to live as seems good to the rest.”

John Rawls
1921 – 2002 Born: United States Died: United States
· Liberal American moral and political philosopher who received both the Schock Prize for Logic and Philosophy and the National Humanities Medal in 1999, the latter presented by President Bill Clinton, who acclaimed Rawls for having “helped a whole generation of learned Americans revive their faith in democracy itself.” He is frequently cited by the courts of law in the United States and Canada.
· Rawls's most discussed work is his theory of a just liberal society, called justice as fairness. Rawls first wrote about this theory in his book A Theory of Justice. Rawls spoke much about the desire for a well-ordered society; a society of free and equal persons cooperating on fair terms of social cooperation.
· Rawls’s most important principle (the Liberty Principal) states that every individual has an equal right to basic liberties. Rawls believes that “personal property” constitutes a basic liberty, but an absolute right to unlimited private property is not.
· Rawls's argument for his principles of social justice uses a thought experiment called the “original position”, in which people select what kind of society they would choose to live under if they did not know which social position they would personally occupy.
“Justice is the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is of systems of thought. A theory however elegant and economical must be rejected or revised if it is untrue; likewise laws and institutions no matter how efficient and well-arranged must be reformed or abolished if they are unjust. Each person possesses an inviolability founded on justice that even the welfare of society as a whole cannot override. For this reason justice denies that the loss of freedom for some is made right by a greater good shared by others. It does not allow that the sacrifices imposed on a few are outweighed by the larger sum of advantages enjoyed by many. Therefore in a just society the liberties of equal citizenship are taken as settled; the rights secured by justice are not subject to political bargaining or to the calculus of social interests.”

Joseph Nye
1937 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· American political scientist and co-founder of the international relations theory of neoliberalism (a theory concerned first and foremost with absolute gains rather than relative gains to other states), developed in the 1977 book Power and Interdependence. He is noted for his notion of “smart power” (“the ability to combine hard and soft power into a successful strategy”), which became a popular phrase with the Clinton and Obama Administrations.
· Secretary of State John Kerry appointed Nye to the Foreign Affairs Policy Board in 2014. In 2014, Nye was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star in recognition of his “contribution to the development of studies on Japan-U.S. security and to the promotion of the mutual understanding between Japan and the United States.”
· From 1977 to 1979, Nye was Deputy to the Undersecretary of State for Security Assistance, Science, and Technology and chaired the National Security Council Group on Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons. In recognition of his service, he was awarded the State Department's Distinguished Honor Award in 1979. In 1993 and 1994, he was Chairman of the National Intelligence Council, which coordinates intelligence estimates for the President, and was awarded the Intelligence Community's Distinguished Service Medal. In the Clinton Administration from 1994 to 1995, Nye served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, and was awarded the Department's Distinguished Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster. Nye was considered by many to be the preferred choice for National Security Advisor in the 2004 presidential campaign of John Kerry.
· Nye has been a member of the Harvard faculty since 1964. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and a foreign fellow of The British Academy. Nye is also a member of the American Academy of Diplomacy. The 2011 TRIP survey of over 1700 international relations scholars ranks Joe Nye as the sixth most influential scholar in the field of international relations in the past twenty years. He was also ranked as most influential in American foreign policy. In 2011, Foreign Policy magazine named him to its list of top global thinkers. In September 2014, Foreign Policy reported that the international relations scholars and policymakers both ranked Nye as one of the most influential scholars.
“When you can get others to admire your ideals and to want what you want, you do not have to spend as much on sticks and carrots to move them in your direction. Seduction is always more effective than coercion, and many values like democracy, human rights, and individual opportunities are deeply seductive.”

Karl Popper
1902 – 1994 Born: Austria-Hungary Died: England
· Karl Popper is generally regarded as one of the greatest philosophers of science of the 20th century. He was a self-professed critical-rationalist, a dedicated opponent of all forms of scepticism, conventionalism, and relativism in science and in human affairs generally and a committed advocate and staunch defender of the ‘Open Society’.
· In ‘The Open Society and Its Enemies’ and ‘The Poverty of Historicism’, Popper developed a critique of historicism and a defense of the “Open Society”. Popper considered historicism to be the theory that history develops inexorably and necessarily according to knowable general laws towards a determinate end. He argued that this view is the principal theoretical presupposition underpinning most forms of authoritarianism and totalitarianism. He argued that historicism is founded upon mistaken assumptions regarding the nature of scientific law and prediction. Since the growth of human knowledge is a causal factor in the evolution of human history, and since “no society can predict, scientifically, its own future states of knowledge”, it follows, he argued, that there can be no predictive science of human history. For Popper, metaphysical and historical indeterminism go hand in hand.
· Popper is known for his vigorous defense of liberal democracy and the principles of social criticism that he believed made a flourishing open society possible. His political philosophy embraced ideas from major democratic political ideologies, including socialism/social democracy, libertarianism/classical liberalism and conservatism, and attempted to reconcile them.
“Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. In this formulation, I do not imply, for instance, that we should always suppress the utterance of intolerant philosophies; as long as we can counter them by rational argument and keep them in check by public opinion, suppression would certainly be most unwise. But we should claim the right to suppress them if necessary even by force; for it may easily turn out that they are not prepared to meet us on the level of rational argument, but begin by denouncing all argument; they may forbid their followers to listen to rational argument, because it is deceptive, and teach them to answer arguments by the use of their fists or pistols. We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant. We should claim that any movement preaching intolerance places itself outside the law, and we should consider incitement to intolerance and persecution as criminal, in the same way as we should consider incitement to murder, or to kidnapping, or to the revival of the slave trade, as criminal.”

Lawrence Summers
1954 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· American economist, former Vice President of Development Economics and Chief Economist of the World Bank, senior U.S. Treasury Department official throughout President Clinton's administration, Treasury Secretary 1999–2001, and former director of the National Economic Council for President Obama (2009–2010). Summers served as the 27th President of Harvard University from 2001 to 2006. Current professor and director of the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.
· As a researcher, Summers has made important contributions in many areas of economics, primarily public finance, labor economics, financial economics, and macroeconomics. Summers has also worked in international economics, economic demography, economic history and development economics.[ He received the John Bates Clark Medal in 1993 from the American Economic Association. In 1987, he was the first social scientist to win the Alan T. Waterman Award from the National Science Foundation. Summers is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences.
· In 1983, at age 28, Summers became one of the youngest tenured professors in Harvard's history. In 2006, Summers resigned as Harvard's president in the wake of a no-confidence vote by Harvard faculty. Summers viewed his beliefs on why science and engineering had an under-representation of women to be a large part in the vote, saying, “There is a great deal of absurd political correctness. Now, I'm somebody who believes very strongly in diversity, who resists racism in all of its many incarnations, who thinks that there is a great deal that's unjust in American society that needs to be combated, but it seems to be that there is a kind of creeping totalitarianism in terms of what kind of ideas are acceptable and are debatable on college campuses.”
· As the World Bank's Vice President of Development Economics and Chief Economist, Summers played a role in designing strategies to aid developing countries, worked on the bank's loan committee, guided the bank's research and statistics operations, and guided external training programs. The World Bank's official site reports that Summer's research included an “influential” report that demonstrated a very high return from investments in educating girls in developing nations. According to The Economist, Summers was “often at the centre of heated debates” about economic policy, to an extent exceptional for the history of the World Bank in recent decades.
· In 1999 Summers endorsed the Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act which removed the separation between investment and commercial banks. In February 2009, Summers quoted John Maynard Keynes, saying “When circumstances change, I change my opinion”, reflecting both on the failures of Wall Street deregulation and his new leadership role in the government bailout.
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Wednesday, May 22nd

Today are:

Bitcoin Pizza Day, celebrated mainly by the cryptocurrency community, takes place on the anniversary of the date that cryptocurrency was used to pay for goods for the first time. On May 18, 2010, Laszlo Hanyecz of Florida posted in the bitcointalk.org forum, offering 10,000 bitcoins in exchange for some pizza, saying in part, "I'll pay 10,000 bitcoins for a couple of pizzas.. like maybe 2 large ones so I have some left over for the next day." His call was answered, and on May 22, 2010, he posted, "I just want to report that I successfully traded 10,000 bitcoins for pizza." A teenager named Jeremy Sturdivant, who went by "jercos" on the forum, sent Hanyecz two Papa John's pizzas, and received 10,000 bitcoins in return. Sturdivant paid about $25 for the pizza, and the 10,000 bitcoins he received became valued at $41.
The events of the first Bitcoin Pizza Day were monumental because they paved the way for the use of cryptocurrency in the future. Nine months after the transaction, the worth of the bitcoins totaled $10,000, meaning each bitcoin had the value of a dollar. On the five year anniversary, the value of the 10,000 bitcoins had risen to about $2.4 million. At one point in 2017, the value rose to over $100 million. As of September 2018, a bitcoin is valued at about $6,000, meaning the value of the 10,000 bitcoins used to pay for the pizza would be about $60 million.
The history of bitcoin dates to the early 2000s, when attempts were made to create a cryptocurrency, although none were fully developed. In 2008, a paper titled "Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System" was posted online. The following year, bitcoin became the first cryptocurrency. Its software was made available to the public, and it began being mined. Mining is "the process through which new bitcoins are created and transactions are recorded and verified on the blockchain." With Hanyecz's transaction for goods on the first Bitcoin Pizza Day, bitcoin gained a specific monetary value—up to that point it had only been mined. Rival cryptocurrencies, often known as altcoin, soon emerged. They usually have been created to try to improve an aspect of bitcoin. Early altcoins were Litecoin and Namecoin, and there are now over 1,000.
In 2013, bitcoin's value reached $1,000, but then crashed to about $300. It took a few years to recover. Over time, as it could be spent at more places, bitcoin's popularity continued to grow, as did its value. Time will only tell if the value of bitcoin will continue to rise, but on Bitcoin Pizza Day we can all remember the day the first cryptocurrency transaction for goods took place, and how the value of a transaction for two pizzas once rose to over $100 million.

Canadian Immigrants Day celebrates those who have immigrated to the United States from Canada. Canada is one of the most sparsely populated countries in the world, and most of its inhabitants live within a few hundred miles of its border with the United States. The border is 5,525 miles in length (this includes the border with Alaska) and is the longest border in the world that is not patrolled by military forces. Besides sharing a border, Canada and the United States share many cultural similarities.
Most Canadians immigrate to the United States by getting a green card, which they usually have obtained because they have immediate relatives in the country, or because they are sponsored by an employer there. Canadians migrate to the United States more than they do to any other country. In 1960, about ten percent of the US foreign-born population was Canadian. Although this was down to two percent in 2012, about 800,000 Canadian immigrants lived in the United States at that time.
The first wave of Canadian immigrants arrived in the 1860s; they were largely unskilled and came for factory jobs. A second wave arrived between 1900 and 1930, and were pushed by the discrimination they had faced in employment, education, and because of their religion. Immigration to the United States began to decline after this, as the Canadian economy began to grow after World War II. During the last half of the twentieth century, especially after the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1994, there was a diversification of Canadian immigrants which included students, those looking to reunite with their families, educated professionals, and retirees with wishes to move to a warmer climate.

Harvey Milk Day honors gay rights activist Harvey Milk and also focuses on stopping discrimination against gays and lesbians. Harvey Milk was born in Long Island, New York, on May 22, 1930. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War, and worked at a Wall Street investment firm for a time afterward, living a closeted gay life at the time. In the early 1960s, his political views were conservative, and he campaigned for Barry Goldwater in 1964. Once he got involved in the New York bohemian theater scene, he began befriending a more avante-garde crowd, and his politics began to shift more progressive. He moved to the San Francisco Bay area in 1969, became involved in the gay social scene, and protested against the Vietnam War. After being fired for participating in an antiwar rally, he returned to New York City in 1970.
After some time working in New York theater, he returned to San Francisco in 1972 and opened a camera shop on Castro Street—the epicenter of the gay community. The following year he ran for a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors for the first time, in part because he thought a tax on small businesses was unfair. He did not win a seat but did manage to finish 10th out of 32 contestants. Afterward, he co-founded the Castro Village Association, which supported gay business owners on Castro Street. He started the Castro Street Fair in 1974, and became known as "Mayor of Castro Street."
He once again lost an election for Board of Supervisors in 1975, and ran for the California State Assembly and was not successful in that bid either. In 1977, he worked to broaden his appeal beyond the gay community, by focusing on taxes, housing, and day-care centers for working mothers. In November 1977, Harvey Milk became the first openly gay person elected to California office, and the first openly gay person elected in a major U.S. city. The rise of Harvey Milk reflected the rise of the gay rights movement across the country, and he was at the forefront of it.
During his tenure in office, Milk pushed for visibility of gay people as well as for social equality. He worked to pass a gay rights ordinance—to ban discrimination in housing, employment, and public accommodations. He spent the summer of 1978 working to defeat Proposition 6—also known as The Briggs Initiative—which would have banned gays and lesbians, or anyone supporting gay rights, from teaching or working in public schools in California. It was defeated at the ballot box that November.
On November 27, 1978, Harvey Milk was assassinated by Dan White, a former Board of Supervisors member, who had resigned a few months earlier and wanted to be reinstated. White first killed San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, and then walked across the building and shot Harvey Milk five times. Dianne Feinstein, who was President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, announced to the press what had taken place. Dan White was convicted of voluntary manslaughter instead of murder, in part because his team used the "Twinkie defense". He was released early and committed suicide in 1985.
Harvey Milk's profile continued to rise after his assassination. In 1982, a biography titled The Mayor of Castro Street was released, bringing Milk's attention to a wider audience. This was followed by an Academy Award-winning documentary, The Times of Harvey Milk, in 1984. Many buildings in California were named after Milk. In 2008, another Academy Award-winning film, Milk, was released. Harvey Milk was posthumously given the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in 2009. That same year, Harvey Milk Day was established by the California legislature and signed into law by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger on October 11. California schools commemorate Milk with activities, events, and projects, and equal rights are focused on. The Harvey Milk Foundation organizes events worldwide.

Sherlock Holmes Day celebrates Sherlock Holmes and the author who created him, Arthur Conan Doyle, who was born on today's date in 1859 in Edinburgh, Scotland. At a young age, Doyle became enthralled by stories his mother told him, which was the spark that eventually would lead him to become a writer. He was sent to a Jesuit preparatory school in England at the age of 9. After a few years, he went on to study at Stonyhurst College, and after graduating in 1876, he went on to pursue a medical degree at the University of Edinburgh. There he met Professor Dr. Joseph Bell, who became his mentor, and later became the inspiration and model for Sherlock Holmes.
While in medical school, Doyle wrote the short stories "The Mystery of Sasassa Valley" and "The American's Tale," the latter of which appeared in London Society magazine. He also worked as a ship surgeon on a whaling ship in the Arctic Circle while in school, which inspired him to write Captain of the Pole Star. After becoming a doctor he moved around for a bit, focusing on his practice, but also continued to write. He also left his Catholic faith and became a Spiritualist. Eventually, he gave up being a doctor and focused solely on his writing and his faith.
Sherlock Holmes and his assistant, Watson, were introduced in the novel A Study in Scarlet, which first appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual in 1887. It was with this novel that Doyle's writing career finally began taking off. Sherlock Holmes, a "consulting detective" who pursued criminals in London, around England, and throughout Europe, has endured as perhaps the most noteworthy detective character of all time. In all, Doyle wrote 60 stories that featured Sherlock Holmes. Some of Doyle's most noteworthy books that include Sherlock Holmes are The Sign of Four, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, and The Hound of the Baskervilles.
In 1893, Doyle tried to kill off Holmes in the short story "The Final Problem," because he wanted to focus more on his writing on Spiritualism. His readers weren't happy—20,000 readers even canceled their subscriptions to Strand Magazine, a magazine which Sherlock Holmes stories often appeared in. Eventually, Doyle was convinced to bring Holmes back. He reintroduced him in 1901 in the novel The Hound of Baskervilles, and then brought him back to life in the story "The Adventure of the Empty House" in 1903. One of the reasons he decided to bring him back was so he could use the profits from the stories to help fund his missionary work. The final twelve Sherlock Holmes stories appeared in the 1928 compilation titled The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes.
Besides his works featuring Sherlock Holmes, Doyle wrote other books such as Beyond the City, The Stark Munro Letters, and A Duet with an Occasional Chorus, as well as a series of works on Spiritualism. He was diagnosed with Angina Pectoris towards the end of his life. On July 7, 1930, Arthur Conan Doyle died in his garden with one hand to his chest and one hand holding a flower. The stories of Sherlock Holmes have continued to have been read, and Sherlock has also lived on in theater and film adaptations of his stories. Today we celebrate both Sherlock Holmes and the author who created him!


Happy Celebrating
submitted by NotJ3st3r to nationalsomethingday [link] [comments]

[H] 500 tradeables games and 50 csgo keys [W] bitcoin

I have LOT games in my inventory and 50 csgo keys you can check my inventory: HERE
I looking for bitcoin!
Feel Free To Add Me!!! Feel Free To Add Me!!!
List of my games:
submitted by bennyh50 to SteamGameSwap [link] [comments]

[H] 500 tradeables games and 50 csgo keys [W] bitcoin

I have LOT games in my inventory and 50 csgo keys you can check my inventory: HERE
I looking for bitcoin!
Feel Free To Add Me!!! Feel Free To Add Me!!!
List of my games:
submitted by bennyh50 to SteamGameSwap [link] [comments]

[H] Games [W] TF2 keys, cards, Bitcoins,

I have steam keys for:
I'm looking for:
cards: The Witcher 2 (foil only), Shogun 2, Warframe, Red Orchestra 2, Arma3, CS:GO,
games: Civ5:BraveNewWorld,
TF2 keys or bitcoins
submitted by Thomasx1 to indiegameswap [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: RedditDayOf top posts from 2015-12-23 to 2016-12-21 16:33 PDT

Period: 364.54 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 6566
Rate (per day) 2.74 17.97
Unique Redditors 311 2698
Combined Score 83364 32293

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 8084 points, 78 submissions: joelschlosberg
    1. actress Linda Hamilton has a twin sister who made it possible for Terminator 2 to film some scenes in one camera shot without compositing (396 points, 15 comments)
    2. Ben Franklin's daily schedule (353 points, 29 comments)
    3. historical marker (314 points, 4 comments)
    4. Isaac Asimov tells a joke involving profanity (300 points, 9 comments)
    5. The swordfights in The Princess Bride, Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon, Highlander, The Mask of Zorro, Die Another Day, The Lord of the Rings, and Pirates of the Caribbean were all made by the same sword master, "the man who stabbed Errol Flynn". Who also did Darth Vader's lightsaber dueling himself. (281 points, 9 comments)
    6. Girl Scouts were told by their official handbook that "you should not be hostile to" Jews and Muslims as early as the 1918 edition. (278 points, 26 comments)
    7. "I hate versions that make Watson stupid. What makes Holmes impressive is that he outthinks smart people, not that he outthinks stupid people." (254 points, 3 comments)
    8. a joke from Isaac Asimov's Treasury of Humor (254 points, 18 comments)
    9. a tiny but full-featured solar-powered movie theater (236 points, 14 comments)
    10. Jetta, the teen-ager from the futuristic 21st century in a pre-Jetsons comic drawn by Archie Comics artist Dan DeCarlo (197 points, 9 comments)
  2. 6984 points, 104 submissions: 0and18
    1. Man Pays $10K For House, Finds $107,000 Comic Book Hidden In Wall (241 points, 13 comments)
    2. xkcd: The Three Laws of Robotics (234 points, 2 comments)
    3. FDA Lifts Decades-Old 32 Year Old Ban On Blood Donations By Gay Men (233 points, 31 comments)
    4. This is Why You Should Never Release 1.5 Million Balloons At Once (191 points, 30 comments)
    5. Teaching Methods (188 points, 2 comments)
    6. Pirámide de Mayo In Argentina covered with photos of all the "disappeared" during the Dirty War (154 points, 2 comments)
    7. In 1958, Mao Zedong ordered all sparrows to be killed. As a direct result, millions of people starved to death. (150 points, 7 comments)
    8. Without leap years, today would be July 15, 2017 Explained in Graphics (148 points, 3 comments)
    9. Film poster for the Rocketeer (135 points, 5 comments)
    10. William Kamkwamba: At age 14, in poverty and famine, a Malawian boy built a windmill to power his family's home (131 points, 3 comments)
  3. 6687 points, 50 submissions: sverdrupian
    1. An adult oyster is capable of filtering 25-50 gallons of water a day. (1030 points, 72 comments)
    2. Making chain. (290 points, 18 comments)
    3. A series of tunnels in Taiwan (261 points, 6 comments)
    4. Artichoke in full bloom (242 points, 2 comments)
    5. USS CONSTITUTION in drydock for restoration - Launched in Boston in 1797, she's the oldest commissioned warship afloat (220 points, 24 comments)
    6. German WW1-era map calling out the Allies for the hypocrisy of promoting self-determination while simultaneously holding vast colonial empires. (202 points, 26 comments)
    7. "Our future is an airport without delays" - 1975 advertisement (189 points, 14 comments)
    8. Bee macro. (184 points, 4 comments)
    9. Het Gekkenhuis - a Dutch caricature map of Europe, 1914. (180 points, 2 comments)
    10. The oarfish, the world's largest known bony fish, is thought to have spawned tales of seas serpents. (178 points, 25 comments)
  4. 4762 points, 58 submissions: wormspermgrrl
    1. During Florida winters, manatees flock to nuclear and coal power plants for the warm water discharges. (414 points, 29 comments)
    2. Happy Birthday song ruled public domain as judge throws out copyright claim (202 points, 8 comments)
    3. 18 cities in Pennsylvania reported higher levels of lead exposure than Flint (194 points, 8 comments)
    4. xkcd: Log Scale (191 points, 8 comments)
    5. Parade Magazine's Ask Marilyn Controversy: The Time Everyone “Corrected” the World’s Smartest Woman (174 points, 18 comments)
    6. Maryam Mirzakhani won the Fields Medal in 2014; she is the first woman to win math’s most prestigious prize (163 points, 1 comment)
    7. Meet the woman who makes fake fingers for Japan's reformed gangsters (161 points, 3 comments)
    8. Google's self-driving car gets pulled over for driving too slowly (157 points, 40 comments)
    9. The Wieliczka Salt Mine, Poland (154 points, 12 comments)
    10. The Decemberists - "The Mariner's Revenge Song" (149 points, 14 comments)
  5. 2906 points, 31 submissions: jaykirsch
    1. 1989 Plymouth Voyager III concept. This is a two piece detachable vehicle (link in comments) (220 points, 21 comments)
    2. "Mission Accomplished" fly-in and speech May 1, 2003. Enormous political PR blunder. (206 points, 5 comments)
    3. Prepared for gas attack in France, WW1 (202 points, 6 comments)
    4. Les Paul with Paul McCartney and a Gibson left-handed "Special." 1988 (201 points, 9 comments)
    5. "Pictured Rocks" on Lake Superior near Munising, MI (180 points, 7 comments)
    6. Art Deco in the home - stylish 1937 GE radio (146 points, 9 comments)
    7. Woody Guthrie on the attack, 1941 (141 points, 2 comments)
    8. The Great 1918 Influenza Pandemic claimed more lives than WW1, including 675,000 (est.) Americans. (Article link in comments) (135 points, 6 comments)
    9. Come on in, kids, I have some pie and a magic mushroom. (129 points, 10 comments)
    10. Yooper "Pastie" in Michigan's UP (122 points, 25 comments)
  6. 2882 points, 23 submissions: appropriate-username
    1. "We come in peace" (470 points, 10 comments)
    2. This GIF illustrates why your phone camera takes weird photos of revolving propellers. (325 points, 12 comments)
    3. An electrical current causing water to form a bridge. (xpost/gifs) (276 points, 10 comments)
    4. This series of photos got the photographer banned from Magic TCG tournaments and is among the top 5 top posts of all time on Reddit (266 points, 33 comments)
    5. "My girlfriend keeps sending me her squids" (245 points, 9 comments)
    6. Pocky is a popular Japanese snack consisting of a cracker-like stick partially covered in chocolate--I can't believe nobody posted it so I can upvote it. Here's a picture of Pocky; the wiki article on it is in the comments. (177 points, 46 comments)
    7. An animated short about a lazy guy in space--35th most popular reddit post of all time (158 points, 10 comments)
    8. xkcd: Centrifugal Force (124 points, 3 comments)
    9. 1,000 x 1,000 x 1,000 Rubik's Cube Solve (by a computer) (114 points, 10 comments)
    10. xkcd: Earth Temperature Timeline (86 points, 4 comments)
  7. 2385 points, 30 submissions: sbroue
    1. Flying hammock [gif] (275 points, 13 comments)
    2. Property for Rent: No Asians (224 points, 17 comments)
    3. Gobi warns his shrimp housekeeper of approaching predator (140 points, 11 comments)
    4. First taste of chocolate for Ivory Coast Cocoa farmers (126 points, 10 comments)
    5. "Hurricane" Higgins finishes the match [gif] (119 points, 17 comments)
    6. Big Booty Bitches (Original Video) (116 points, 16 comments)
    7. The Blessing and launching of HMS Albion (1898) created a wave that drowned 39 people, you see them bottom left in some of the earliest disaster footage (110 points, 6 comments)
    8. Pizza with mini meat-pies baked in the crust Australian frankenfood (106 points, 6 comments)
    9. Bought for £1, the mysterious tower that inspired JRR Tolkien (101 points, 1 comment)
    10. Castro meets Nixon: April 1959 [pic] (100 points, 4 comments)
  8. 1687 points, 32 submissions: ceegee1975
    1. Nicolas Cage returns stolen dinosaur skull he bought at auction for $276,000 (192 points, 11 comments)
    2. Why Hypercolor T-Shirts Were Just a One-Hit Wonder (99 points, 15 comments)
    3. Clean My Space. A youtube channel devoted to cleaning just about anything (98 points, 3 comments)
    4. Scientists have breached the blood-brain barrier for the first time to treat a brain tumour (83 points, 2 comments)
    5. They Might Be Giants-Ana Ng (78 points, 8 comments)
    6. How It's Made: Balloons (74 points, 4 comments)
    7. Mr. Bean The Movie - 'Gun' Scene (72 points, 6 comments)
    8. The Best Homemade Girl Scout Cookie Recipes (71 points, 5 comments)
    9. Monty Python - How Not to Be Seen (68 points, 2 comments)
    10. George Carlin - Euphemisms (65 points, 8 comments)
  9. 1623 points, 13 submissions: mrekted
    1. Legendary con man, scam artist, and forger Frank Abagnale Jr. pictured in the pilots seat of a Pan Am airliner. He flew over 1,000,000 miles while wearing a Pan Am uniform. He was never their employee, nor was he a pilot. (484 points, 24 comments)
    2. What It's Like When Reddit Wrongly Accuses Your Loved One Of Murder - The Boston Marathon Bomber Reddit Witch Hunt (240 points, 23 comments)
    3. Tim's Vermeer - Penn Jillette chronicles a mans ridiculously compulsive and obsessive five year obsession with reverse engineering and mastering the artistic techniques of Dutch master painter Vermeer (148 points, 6 comments)
    4. Cadillac Ranch, Amarillo TX. A bizarre, macabre tribute to the American love affair with the automobile. Visitors are encouraged to add their own ideas and messages to the memorial with spray paint. (133 points, 7 comments)
    5. 2010 - Reddit comes to the aid of a terminally ill little girl who was being cruelly harassed by her neighbors (126 points, 7 comments)
    6. In 2013, a UK man scoured the local dump after realizing he threw away a hard disk that contained 7500 bitcoins. At current market value those coins are worth a little over 5.5 million USD. (125 points, 4 comments)
    7. A float in the first Macy's Day Parade in 1924 (95 points, 1 comment)
    8. On Halloween 1938, Orson Welles enters legend with a radio play that convinced listeners that the planet was under attack by aliens from outer space (68 points, 1 comment)
    9. That's one fuckin' nice kitty right there. (51 points, 0 comments)
    10. Stampedes, pepper spray, fist fights, shootouts, and death. This is Black Friday in the United States. (49 points, 4 comments)
  10. 1535 points, 23 submissions: themanwhosleptin
    1. The reason why The Simpsons are yellow is because the creator Matt Groening wanted them to be recognizable when you flip through channels on the TV (194 points, 7 comments)
    2. Shoes (189 points, 3 comments)
    3. On April Fool's Day 2014, NPR posted a fake article on its Facebook page titled "Why Doesn't America Read Anymore?" When clicking on the post, the article asks its readers to not comment on it. Not surprisingly, many people commented anyway. (167 points, 7 comments)
    4. Gran Torino (2008) - a film about an elderly racist Korean War vet, his Hmong neighbors, and their struggles with street gangs (115 points, 11 comments)
    5. Napoleon's Exile In Saint Helena (91 points, 2 comments)
    6. Munchkin - a card game that parodies tabletop RPGs) (90 points, 7 comments)
    7. Meet Brother Najeeb Michael, the monk who saved thousands of manuscripts from IS jihadists (66 points, 1 comment)
    8. The Jimmy Timmy Power Hour - a television crossover film trilogy set between the universes in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius and The Fairly OddParents (66 points, 2 comments)
    9. Tibetan Monks and Nuns Turn Their Minds Toward Science (51 points, 1 comment)
    10. The Rule of Thirds - a fundamental technique in photography (47 points, 0 comments)
  11. 1218 points, 14 submissions: justtoclick
    1. "Do it yourself doodler" album (359 points, 8 comments)
    2. If Harry Potter was an anime series (171 points, 37 comments)
    3. The Muppets explain Phenomenology (122 points, 4 comments)
    4. Hawaii Still Has a Leprosy Colony With Six Patients (94 points, 17 comments)
    5. David Bowie song 'Changes' inspired Brandon Flowers to form The Killers (59 points, 4 comments)
    6. Dave Barry’s 2015 Year in Review (57 points, 1 comment)
    7. U.S. Muslims to overtake Jews by 2026 (53 points, 9 comments)
    8. The Beatles Play Ed Sullivan: The Historic TV Appearance Heralding the British Invasion (52 points, 0 comments)
    9. The Evolution of Batman's Bat Symbol [Infographic] (51 points, 10 comments)
    10. Cycling With the Psycos -- Counterculture feminism in East L.A (48 points, 0 comments)
  12. 1191 points, 14 submissions: Lillyclown
    1. A Pocket Guide to Vaginal Euphemisms (197 points, 33 comments)
    2. The story behind the McDonalds hot coffee lawsuit (165 points, 28 comments)
    3. The Polish Beer Drinking Party (PPPP), orginally a satirical political party to promote beer, not vodka, and fight alcoholism, won 16 seats in the 1991 parliamentary election. Later splitting to Big Beer and Little Beer. (126 points, 6 comments)
    4. History of Color (115 points, 3 comments)
    5. The Chemistry of Ice Cream (89 points, 6 comments)
    6. 150 year old sunken steam boat's contents. Including still edible food! (87 points, 3 comments)
    7. The Strangest, Most Spectacular Bridge Collapse (65 points, 7 comments)
    8. All Blacks haka (61 points, 1 comment)
    9. The Poisoning of a City (61 points, 0 comments)
    10. British Police use Tea as a perfect analogy for sexual consent. (57 points, 9 comments)
  13. 1147 points, 14 submissions: Radu316
    1. There's a statue of Lenin at the Pole of Inaccessibility in Antarctica. It was on top of a Soviet research station in the 60s. Abandoned in '67, it was forgotten until 2007 when it was rediscovered by a team of explorers. By then, the statue was the only part still visible. (167 points, 2 comments)
    2. Strelka was one of the first animals in space to return safely. She became a sensation in the Soviet Union and had puppies with cosmo-dog Pushok. Nikita Khrushchev gave a puppy, Pushinka, to JFK as a gift. She also had puppies and Strelka's bloodline is still alive in the United States. (147 points, 7 comments)
    3. The Turk was an 18th century chess-playing automaton. It went on a tour of Europe and America, defeating noted chess players like Ben Franklin and Napoleon. After being destroyed in a fire, it was revealed to be a hoax - a person (usually a chessmaster) hid inside and operated it. (136 points, 10 comments)
    4. "Houston, we have a problem" is a slight misquote popularized by the Apollo 13 movie. The real line was actually "Houston, we've had a problem" and was first said by astronaut John Swigert, not mission captain Jim Lovell. (115 points, 14 comments)
    5. Marginalia are all the various scribbles and comments made in margins of books or documents. In medieval times, religious texts written by nuns and monks featured marginalia with all sorts of vulgar images and dirty jokes. (96 points, 5 comments)
    6. Brain crater on Mars. The bizarre texture of the crater floor makes it resemble a brain. NASA worked out that, at 0.6 miles wide, the brain is about the right size to fit inside the mound known as the Face of Mars. (90 points, 0 comments)
    7. Statue of Alexander the Great taming Bucephalus. Bucephalus is often regarded as the most famous (real) horse in history. According to Plutarch, the horse died at the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 BC. Afterwards Alexander founded the city of Bucephalia in his honor somewhere in modern day Pakistan. (81 points, 4 comments)
    8. Pretty much everything there is to know about tartan (aka plaid in America). The pattern of the kilt can be used to display your family background, royal lineage, service in specific branches of the military, even your name. You can even register new ones at the Scottish Register of Tartans. (79 points, 4 comments)
    9. "There's a sucker born every minute" is a quote attributed to P.T. Barnum, but it was actually said by David Hannum, one of his competitors. Hannum said it referring to people who paid to see Barnum's Cardiff Giant instead of his original, not realizing that both were fake. (60 points, 0 comments)
    10. Heart of Neolithic Orkney is a 5,000-year old world heritage site in Scotland. It includes four monuments: two ceremonial stone circles, a tomb and a former village called Skara Brae. Skara Brae is sometimes called "Scottish Pompeii" because it is so well-preserved. (47 points, 2 comments)
  14. 1128 points, 13 submissions: StochasticLife
    1. Banned until the 1980's, rock music in the USSR was smuggled around the country on records made from X Ray film. They were called 'Ribs' or 'Bone Records'. (216 points, 14 comments)
    2. Lithuania has only ever had a single king, Mindaugus. He was crowned king in 1251 and assassinated in 1263. (157 points, 5 comments)
    3. Russian had a monopoly on Vodka for over 400 years (1540's - 1992) and at one point Vodka sales made up 40% of the state's revenue (130 points, 8 comments)
    4. A nickelodeon was a hastily assembled movie theater, often setup in converted store fronts, that charged a nickle for admission. They were most popular between 1905 and 1915.) (114 points, 0 comments)
    5. Christopher Hitchen's video - Mother Theresa Hell's Angel, a critical look at her political relationships and the nature of her charitable practices. (109 points, 11 comments)
    6. Zatoichi, about a blind swordsmen, is one of Japan longest running film and TV series with over 27 films and 100 TV Episodes. (91 points, 6 comments)
    7. The oldest (surviving), and largest, Baha'i house of worship is in Wilmette Illiniois.) (64 points, 8 comments)
    8. Some humans (all women) are tetrachromats and are capable of seeing millions of colors the rest of us can't see (60 points, 10 comments)
    9. Geddy Lee of Rush was born in Canada to parents who were Polish Immigrants and holocaust survivors of Auschwitz, Dachu, and Bergen-Belsen. (50 points, 2 comments)
    10. North Korea prints the best counterfeit $100 (USD) bills in the world; they have been dubbed the 'Supernote' (45 points, 0 comments)
  15. 910 points, 8 submissions: frigate
    1. Salmon farmers choose the desired orangness-pinkness of their product from a colour chart (SalmoFan) provided by a company which supplies the food dyes to colour farmed salmon that would otherwise be gray, khaki, pale yellow, or pale pink (191 points, 10 comments)
    2. Kurt Vonnegut humorously graphs the shapes of stories (162 points, 5 comments)
    3. The Highway Hi-Fi: the short-lived record player designed for use in automobiles in the 1950's (155 points, 10 comments)
    4. H&M is making a $99 wedding dress. Here’s what that says about economics. (138 points, 43 comments)
    5. How a Math Genius Hacked OkCupid to Find True Love (100 points, 18 comments)
    6. A few of the most impressive and iconic pipe organs from around the world (81 points, 3 comments)
    7. Truth and Reconciliation Commission: By the numbers – The odds of a child dying in a residential school were about the same as a Canadian soldier dying in World War 2 (48 points, 2 comments)
    8. Gordon Lightfoot superfans cherish every show – "Lightfoot lifers" are fans of Gordon Lightfoot who see as many performances as possible (35 points, 1 comment)
  16. 854 points, 5 submissions: CryptoCollectibles
    1. Cows Playing With Hay .gif (351 points, 24 comments)
    2. Super Antics #8 by Kerry Callen (303 points, 18 comments)
    3. This Ad for /Bitcoin made Two Years Ago, As relevant today as ever describing CryptoCurrency (114 points, 3 comments)
    4. How to Draw Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from 1986 (43 points, 1 comment)
    5. DIY: 25 Wearable Geek Projects You Can Knit or Crochet (43 points, 0 comments)
  17. 698 points, 7 submissions: goofballl
    1. Hongdae's (in Seoul) Love Museum features a single exhibit on the history of pornography in Korea. The rest of the museum is taken up with interactive sex-related photo ops. (203 points, 6 comments)
    2. Last known VCR maker stopped production in July, 40 years after VHS format launch (140 points, 9 comments)
    3. Although the exact cause for vitiligo remains unknown, it is thought to be caused by the immune system attacking and destroying the melanocytes of the skin. It famously affected Michael Jackson, causing sections of his skin to lighten over time. (106 points, 13 comments)
    4. Utchari, one of the most difficult moves in sumo, requires a wrestler to lift their opponent entirely off the ground and throw him behind and to the side. (89 points, 7 comments)
    5. Yamadera (lit. mountain temple) is a temple complex found in Yamagata Prefecture after a thousand step climb. It's where the poet Matsuo Basho penned his famous haiku: In the stillness/the cry of the cicada/penetrates the rock. (88 points, 10 comments)
    6. Cauliflower ear occurs when a blood clot forms between ear cartilage and connective tissue. This causes the cartilage to die, creating a deformity common to grappling sports like wrestling. (39 points, 3 comments)
    7. Guillain–Barré syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the peripheral nerves and damages their myelin insulation. During the disease, only a third of afflicted people are able to walk, and the exact cause of the disease can remain unknown. (33 points, 0 comments)
  18. 698 points, 7 submissions: E_Pluriscoop_Unum
    1. Roger Ebert: "Ponyo [is] one of the very rare movies where I want to sit in the front row, to drown in it. This is more than “artistry.” It is art." (211 points, 11 comments)
    2. Chocolate Rain - Tay Zonday (138 points, 7 comments)
    3. Billy West, the voice of Nickelodeon, talking about some of his voices. (122 points, 7 comments)
    4. Pingu - A beloved children's show from Switzerland (68 points, 5 comments)
    5. Nümberwang - Mitchell & Webb (58 points, 0 comments)
    6. A point about drawing swords (57 points, 3 comments)
    7. Werner Herzog's Disoriented Penguin (44 points, 3 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. wil (3635 points, 155 comments)
  2. 0and18 (584 points, 284 comments)
  3. wormspermgrrl (350 points, 214 comments)
  4. joelschlosberg (334 points, 58 comments)
  5. twitch1982 (222 points, 19 comments)
  6. balrogath (218 points, 36 comments)
  7. justtoclick (216 points, 38 comments)
  8. sverdrupian (199 points, 31 comments)
  9. appropriate-username (154 points, 49 comments)
  10. jaykirsch (151 points, 51 comments)
  11. davidystephenson (145 points, 7 comments)
  12. mrekted (138 points, 5 comments)
  13. no-fun-at-parties (136 points, 17 comments)
  14. Neebat (128 points, 17 comments)
  15. ceegee1975 (112 points, 45 comments)
  16. Disaster_Area (111 points, 4 comments)
  17. markevens (108 points, 8 comments)
  18. raendrop (107 points, 11 comments)
  19. Hazlzz (103 points, 6 comments)
  20. sunnieskye1 (99 points, 14 comments)
  21. Otterfan (96 points, 9 comments)
  22. sbroue (95 points, 18 comments)
  23. xkcd_transcriber (95 points, 11 comments)
  24. DnMarshall (95 points, 5 comments)
  25. rlbond86 (94 points, 15 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. An adult oyster is capable of filtering 25-50 gallons of water a day. by sverdrupian (1030 points, 72 comments)
  2. I was a child star in the 80s. AMA by wil (574 points, 535 comments)
  3. Legendary con man, scam artist, and forger Frank Abagnale Jr. pictured in the pilots seat of a Pan Am airliner. He flew over 1,000,000 miles while wearing a Pan Am uniform. He was never their employee, nor was he a pilot. by mrekted (484 points, 24 comments)
  4. "We come in peace" by appropriate-username (470 points, 10 comments)
  5. The anime Ghost Stories was a mediocre show without much to write home about. However, when it came time to translate it to English, the dub team was given enough leeway that they pretty much parodied the original material. The results are hilarious. by selfproclaimed (439 points, 38 comments)
  6. During Florida winters, manatees flock to nuclear and coal power plants for the warm water discharges. by wormspermgrrl (414 points, 29 comments)
  7. A brief Batman comic by Czarry (396 points, 8 comments)
  8. actress Linda Hamilton has a twin sister who made it possible for Terminator 2 to film some scenes in one camera shot without compositing by joelschlosberg (396 points, 15 comments)
  9. "Do it yourself doodler" album by justtoclick (359 points, 8 comments)
  10. Ben Franklin's daily schedule by joelschlosberg (353 points, 29 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 175 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  2. 137 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  3. 135 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  4. 101 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  5. 101 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  6. 92 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  7. 92 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  8. 87 points: deleted's comment in Cause of Death for Yuri Gagarin, 1st Man in Space, Finally Revealed
  9. 86 points: markevens's comment in Woman ruins marriage on game show and still loses
  10. 84 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
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Metabans to accept Bitcoin donations!

Hey Everyone,
I'm proud to announce that I've just helped Metabans with Bitcoin donations!
If you don't know them, Metabans is a community driven database of players. You can use it to report your findings on a player, view other people’s assessments of players or follow those you trust to enforce their banlists on your servers.
The games they provide services for include the ENTIRE Call of Duty series, Battlefield BC2, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Medal of Honor 2010, Medal of Honor: Warfighter, and Homefront!
Our clan personally uses and loves their services. We are especially excited about the fact that they accept bitcoin donations considering they are a non-profit project. Feel free to join our teamspeak Battlefield 4 players @ ts.assassinsnation.com !!!
-UltraSPARC
submitted by UltraSPARC to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Martha Roby for Congress Test  Medal of Honor 2010  ATI Radeon HD 5450 1GB franzn1 - YouTube Medal Of Honor: Airborne [P1] NoCommentary Walkthrough Medal of Honor 2010 - Walkthrough - [ Day 1 : Gunfighters] ( MOH 2010 Gameplay )

Medal of Honor (2010) Publisher: Electronic Arts Developer: Danger Close Games, EA Digital Illusions Creative Entertainment Minimum System Requirements OS: Windows XP/Vista/7 Processor: Intel Pentium 4 @ 3.0 GHz / AMD Athlon 64 3200+ Memory: 2 Gb Hard Drive: 10 Gb free Video Memory: 256 Mb Video Card: nVidia GeForce 7800 / ATI Radeon X1900 Sound Card: DirectX Compatible DirectX: 9.0c Keyboard ... Medal of Honor erscheint für Playstation 3, Xbox 360 und Windows-PC und kommt voraussichtlich Ende 2010 auf den Markt - möglicherweise zeitgleich mit Call of Duty 7. Bitte aktivieren Sie Javascript. Medal of Honor PC GAME 2010 . Magnet Download; Torrent Download. ITORRENTS MIRROR; TORRAGE MIRROR; BTCACHE MIRROR; None Working? Use Magnet; D‌irect Download; An‌on‌ymous Download; Category Games; Type PC Game; Language English; Total size 3.2 GB; Uploaded By ahmedbaloch; Downloads 23861; Last checked 22 minutes ago; Date uploaded 9 years ago; Seeders 279; Leechers 19; Your IP Address is ... Bitcoin; Medal of Honor 2010 Screenshots! Home » Video Game News ⁄ Facebook 0; Twitter 0; Google+ 0; Here are the very first Medal of Honor 2010 Screenshots!. The upcoming Medal of Honor will be using the Unreal3 engine and looks really better than any other MoH game before. You will be part of Tier 1 Elite Ops in Afghanistan in Medal of Honor 2010. In singleplayer-mode you will be able to ... Medal of Honor 2010 HD Wallpaper Theme. EA has released two new wallpapers for their upcoming Call of Duty Black Ops killer Medal of Honor 2010. (more…) New Medal of Honor 2010 Screenshots Emerge. A bunch of new Medal of Honor 2010 Screenshots have been released by EA. So far, it looks a lot like Call of Duty 6.. (more…)

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Martha Roby for Congress "Door"

TOP 6 BEST LOW END PC GAMES (2GB) #1.GHOST RECON : FUTURE SOLDIER #2.SPES OPS : THE LINE #3.TOM Clancy's : Splinter Cell: Blacklist #4.Medal of Honor : 2010 #5.CALL OF DUTY : WORLD AT WAR #6 ... The Fall of Bitcoin Jesse Ventura Off The Grid - Ora TV Can we trust cryptocurrency? Today, Jesse Ventura tackles the Bitcoin on #OffTheGrid. After Silk Road was seized and Mt. Gox closed ... โหลดเกมส์และติดตั้งเกม Medal of Honor 2010 แบบไฟล์เดียว - Duration: 3 minutes, 11 seconds. โหลดเกมส์ PC ... Medal of Honor 2010 Mission 7 "Friends from Afar" Single Player Walkthrough [HD] - Duration: 14:04. ... Bitcoin Mining Speed with ATI Radeon HD 5870 - Duration: 0:48. how2videos101 14,267 views ... Played on ORIGINAL HARDWARE & Upscaled with Framemeister if old Gen Console Donate Bitcoin: 1HjshkvbwCnak9pbwBrJo4oQHD3xKaN8T7 https://www.g2a.com/r/westmani...

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